Mr. Smith’s Money

The price-to-earnings ratio in the S&P 500 is about 23.  Is it even meaningful?

Some say a zero-interest-rate environment justifies paying more for stocks. That’s compounding the error. If we behaved rationally, we’d see both asset classes as mispriced, both overpriced.

All investors and all public companies want risk assets to be well-valued rather than poorly valued, sure. But Warren Buffett wasn’t the first to say you shouldn’t pay more for something than it’s worth.

What’s happening now is we don’t know what anything is worth.

Which reminds me of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT).  The words “money” and “theory” shouldn’t be used in conjunction, because they imply a troubling uncertainty about the worth of the thing everyone relies on to meter their lives.

That is, we all, in some form or another, trade time, which is finite, for money, which is also finite but less so than time, thanks to central banks, which create more of it than God gave us time.

Every one of us trading time of fixed value for money of floating value is getting hosed, and it’s showing up in the stock and bond markets.

Let me explain.  Current monetary thinking sees money as debits and credits.  If gross domestic product is debited by a pandemic because people lose their jobs and can’t buy stuff, the solution is for the government to credit the economy with an equal and offsetting amount of money, balancing the books again.

This is effectively MMT.  You MMTers, don’t send me long dissertations, please. I’m being obtuse for effect.

The problem in the equation is the omission of time, which is the true denominator of all valuable things (how much times goes into the making of diamonds, for instance? Oil?). Monetarists treat time as immaterial next to money.

If it takes John Smith 35 years to accumulate enough money to retire on, and the Federal Reserve needs the blink of an eye to manufacture the same quantity and distribute it via a lending facility, John Smith has been robbed.

How? Mr. Smith’s money will now be insufficient (increasing his dependency on government) because the increase in the availability of money will reduce the return Mr. Smith can generate from lending it to someone else to produce an income stream.

Mispriced bonds.  They don’t yield enough and they cost too much.

So by extension the cost of everything else must go up.  Why? Because every good, every service, will need just a little more capital to produce them, as its value has been diminished.  To offset that effect, prices must rise.

And prices can’t rise enough to offset this effect, so you pay 23 times for the earnings of the companies behind the goods and services when before you would only pay 15 times.

And this is how it becomes impossible to know the worth of anything.

And then it gets complicated.  Read a balance sheet of the Federal Reserve from 2007.  The Fed makes up its own accounting rules that don’t jive with the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles that all public companies must follow.

But it was pretty straightforward.  And there were about $10 billion of excess bank reserves on a monthly average, give or take.

Try reading that balance sheet today with all its footnotes.  It’s a game of financial Twister, and the reason isn’t time or money, but theory.  A theory of money that omits its time-value leads people to write things like:

The Board’s H.4.1 statistical release, “Factors Affecting Reserve Balances of Depository Institutions and Condition Statement of Federal Reserve Banks,” has been modified to include information related to TALF II LLC. The TALF II LLC was introduced on the H.4.1 cover note on June 18, 2020 https://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h41/current/.

The theory is that if you just keep footnoting the balance sheet to describe increasingly tangled assets and offsetting liabilities, so long as it zeroes out at the end, everything will be fine.

Except it leaves out Mr. Smith and his limited time on the earth.

Oh, and excess bank reserves are now nearly $3 trillion instead of $10 billion, proof money isn’t worth what it was.

This then breaks down fundamental constructs of valuation.  And it’s why we offer Market Structure Analytics.  While fundamentals can no longer in any consistently reliable way be used to discern what the stock market is doing, Market Structure Analytics lays reasons bare.

For instance, Market Structure Sentiment™ ticked up for TSLA July 2. Good time to buy. It’s got nothing to do with fundamentals.  FB Market Structure Sentiment™ ticked up June 23. Good time to buy. In fact, it’s a 1.0/10.0 right now, but it’s 57% short, so it’s got just limited upside.  Heard all the negative stuff that would tank FB? Fat chance. Market structure rules this Mad Max world.

Public companies, if you want to understand your stock, you have to use tools that take into account today’s madness. Ours do.  Same for you, traders. Sign up for a free 14-day trial at www.marketstructureedge.com and see what drives stocks.

How does it all end? At some point Mr. Smith will lose faith, and the currency will too.  We should stop the madness before then.