Tagged: Circuit Breakers

Lulled by Markets

Palo Alto is a great town.

While there sponsoring IR Magazine’s West Coast Think Tank last week we feasted at Evvia and Fuki Sushi. Denver’s got fine sushi. Our Sushi Den on South Pearl Street flat demoralizes Bryant Park’s Koi. Proprietors Toshi and Yasu Kizaki each day fly in hand-picked selections from the Tokyo fish market. You gotta get up pretty early to beat our fish. Fuki Sushi apparently rises at dawn. We ate to dullness.

Speaking of lulled, exchanges began introducing new SEC-approved Limit-Up/Limit-Down (LULD) single-stock circuit breakers Monday, smartly easing the program into effect. More will be added until the largest 2,000 are covered by late May and the rest of the market through August.

“It sounds simple, but for firms managing thousands of customer orders, you have to program how you’ll manage them, how you’ll deal with quotes and trades across 50 destinations, routing decisions and execution quality,” Chris Concannon, partner at high-frequency trading firm Virtu Financial, told Bloomberg reporter Nina Mehta.

Under LULD, stocks won’t be permitted to trade more than a certain percentage from their rolling five-minute average prices. The SEC mandated these changes after the Flash Crash of May 6, 2010, sent the S&P 500 plunging over a hundred points and the Dow Industrials a thousand points, before both rebounded, all in roughly twenty minutes. (more…)

Instant Replay

Let’s go to the tape.

That’s what we hear in sports now, especially football. Send it to the replay booth. Forget the referee’s call. We’ll check frame-by-frame and – yes, see, right there, his pinky finger holding the ball broke the goal line. TD!

I’m not suggesting instant replay is bad. We want accuracy. But revisiting calls changes the game. There’s a flow and rhythm disrupted by continual play-stoppages. There’s inherent sterility. We introduce a standard of perfection into an atmosphere dependent on imperfection. The game is played by imperfect humans and officiated by other imperfect ones.

With instant replay, the league is decreeing that officiating must be the one perfect element. To effect perfection, somebody loses. Players and the game are deprived of pace. We relieve participants of the opportunity packaged in every missed call to exercise character and behave gracefully. After all, life is neither perfect nor fair.

It’s a tradeoff.

We’ve got the same one in the markets. In fact, as I write, my email dinged with another trading halt, the second inside seven minutes (for NPSP and SCOG). No wait, we just had two more, for symbols SCLP and SGGG. These were all T2 or T12 halts at the Nasdaq, indicating market pauses to assess information, rather than single-stock circuit breakers as we saw multiple times the past five days under trading-halt codes T5-T7.

And yesterday as money gleefully cashed in derivatives ahead of options expirations today-Fri (rarely a good leading indicator for equities), stocks moved wildly all over the place – but just inside circuit breakers. (more…)

Stocks, dollars and Newtonian physics

Isaac Newton posited 334 years ago in his third law of motion that mutual forces of action and reaction between two bodies are equal.

I wonder what he’d think of the relationship between the US dollar and equities, where this small action produces that decidedly unequal reaction.

After the Federal Reserve acted to shore up bank balance sheets by buying long bonds and mortgage-backed securities last week, the dollar trampolined and markets dropped like Newton’s apple.

Pundits blamed dismal economic data. Yet we saw money market-wide shifting from equities September 16 with quad-witching. Before the Fed offered a dim economic portrait. If money was reacting, it sure had a funny, proactive, organized way of showing it.

Today and Monday, the dollar weakened and stocks zoomed skyward in a Newton-flummoxing frenzy to reclaim paradise lost. How many believe this is rational investment behavior? If you do, there’s a solar-panel plant in California that might interest you. (more…)

Among the eight panelists pondering how to forestall another Flash Crash, my favorite quote comes from Columbia professor and Nobel winner in Economic Sciences Joseph Stiglitz, who said in a 2008 paper: “Dollars are a depreciating asset.”

Potent statement. I invite you to consider its ramifications some other time, however. Let’s discuss what the Flash Crash Panel’s recommendations mean to the IR chair. They will affect how your stock trades.

We read all fourteen ideas. They range from charging traders for excessively posting orders and cancelling them, to setting limits on the permitted up/down movement of stocks and imposing circuit breakers for all securities save the most thinly traded. The panel clearly aimed at addressing investor uncertainty through controlling outcomes. If stocks are constrained to ranges, and algorithms to supervision, incentives are adjusted to encourage this, and fees imposed to stop that, the net result will be less uncertainty, the panelists hope.

The net result will be a market suited only to passive index money. If that’s what you want then you’ll be happy. If you want vital markets, where investors can differentiate your shares from other stocks, then a market built around rigid conformity is not for you. (more…)

Pay Attention to Your Trading

We’re leaving most of this week’s email to our friend Joe Saluzzi at Themis Trading. Joe is a groundbreaking and thoughtful critic of contemporary trading, and among the smartest people we know. Last October, Steve Kroft interviewed Joe on 60 Minutes about our machine-driven markets.

Read what Joe says below about the recent Nasdaq website security issue. Even if you trade elsewhere. You all trade everywhere today. Do you know how much of your volume trades on your listing exchange?

How about your volume at other venues? The brokers executing these trades? The smallest investor trading just 100 shares can know whether a trade is executed on an agency or principal basis. But public companies don’t even know the brokers behind the majority of trades.

How about your daily short volume? Exchanges are currently implementing circuit breakers on short trades as required under SEC amendments to Reg SHO. But public companies don’t even know what part of their daily volume is short. (more…)

There Are Spreads and There Are Spreads

Why do many stock prices move intraday by 3-5% or more when price spreads are in pennies?

Before we answer, we enjoyed New Orleans last week, despite humidity that had us struggling to distinguish the surrounding atmosphere from Lake Pontchartrain.

The NIRI Southwest Regional Conference concluded with brisk canvassing of key issues, wrapping on “would you choose an IR career again?” (Unanimous yes from panelists)

Bourbon Street hopped as usual, tourists with beer in cups labeled “giant donkey,” in so many words. We heard from the bartender at Pierre Maspero’s that (more…)