Tagged: David Weild

Spread Too Thin

What if?

Those two words branded with a question mark may rank 2nd all-time behind “what is the meaning of life?”

What if…public companies could set spreads in their own trades?

Before we ponder that, let’s tip hats to IROs Moriah Shilton at Tessera Technology (TSRA) and Kate Scolnick at Seagate (STX), who demonstrated such adroit command of market structure in yesterday’s NIRI webinar on why trading matters in the IR chair (replay available for NIRI members). Expertise like theirs is the future of our profession. Knowledge, as always and ever, is power.

Speaking of knowledge, the SEC yesterday convened a round table on price-spreads in trading, commonly known as “tick-size.” On the panels were finance professors, representatives from major exchanges, venture capitalists, folks from Fidelity and Invesco – and thankfully, David Weild at Grant Thornton/Capital Markets Advisory Partners, and Pat Healy from Issuer Advisory Group, both strong advocates for the interests of public companies.

But there wasn’t a CEO, CFO or IRO from a public company (Moriah Shilton and Kate Scolnick should be on these panels!).

Here’s the issue. Ever since increments between the best prices to buy and sell shares were set by law in 2001 with Decimalization, trading volume has exploded but ranks of public companies and broker-dealers have fallen. In 1997, there were 7,500 public companies. Today there are 3,700 in the National Market System.

At the time, a belief prevailed that small investors couldn’t get a fair shake because brokers and specialists controlled prices in stock markets. So the SEC mandated that prices be set in penny increments. No more trading in eighths or sixteenths of a dollar.

In 1983 there were roughly 450 IPOs in the USA. Thirteen years later in 1996, about 700. The last year US markets remotely approached “hundreds” of IPOs – and thus, hundreds of IR jobs – was in 2000, right before Decimalization. (more…)

Losing Facebook

What’s green and brown, and rolls? The terrain south of Santa Fe where we rode 103 miles on bikes Sunday, averaging 15.6 mph through 4,500 feet of climbing and insistent New Mexico winds. Icing: We saw the eclipse, glimpsed through a combination of my Droid and some passerby’s strip of roll-film. We were pleased.

Less pleased were buyers of Facebook shares. Another market-structure lesson, IR folks.

Remember the Infinite Monkey Theorem (now also a winery here in CO)? The notion was that infinite monkeys randomly clicking keys of infinite typewriters – dating the era from whence this theory arose – could reproduce our great literary works by accident.

Whether ‘twas to be or not, the Infinite Monkey Theorem tripped up trading at the Nasdaq in Facebook. With trades machinating through theoretically infinite combinations of data points, it was impossible for Nasdaq engineers to anticipate every erroneous outcome. Thus, hypothetical monkeys pounding figurative keys bumbled into an unanticipated event.

Part B. Confusion over who owned what when the music died shouts through a bullhorn at us about the way markets work. Most trades are intermediated using shares that, for lack of a better descriptor, are rented. The buying and selling is often (60%+) not real.

You’ve seen an auction, right? “Do I hear $42?” Somebody raises a finger, and the price of the thing up for auction becomes $42. Is that what the buyer pays? No. It’s a bid. (more…)