Tagged: Deutsche Borse

Exchanges Depend on Arbitrage

What if some mathematical calculations in the market are just there to get a reaction?

Traders have not to my knowledge named them “Charlie Sheen.” But alert reader Walt Schuplak at the Market Intelligence Group in New York sent an item about rogue algorithms. Our friend Joe Saluzzi at Themis Trading wrote on it yesterday.

Joe explains that certain trading practices create arbitrage opportunity. Profiting from divergence isn’t bad of itself, Joe notes. But if the chance to profit is fostered where divergence could not or would not occur on its own, it raises fundamental questions.

Bloomberg writer Nina Mehta wrote today about the Australian government’s initial rejection of the Singapore Exchange’s effort to buy the Oz stock market. Singapore is a shareholder-owned exchange. The Deutsche Bourse is public. Same with the InterContinental Exchange, throwing in with the Nasdaq on a bid for the NYSE, both of which are public too. The London and Toronto markets are run by public companies. BATS may IPO. (more…)

Explosive Growth in the OTC Market

You might think “OTC” stands for “off the charts,” which is how we’d rate both the skiing in Winter Park last week and the 70-degree temperatures in Denver Sunday that allowed me to get a post-skiing tan on the back deck.

Actually, OTC stands for “over the counter.” It describes brokers doing business directly with each other, and it’s a big reason why NYSE Euronext and the Deutsche Bourse (everybody spells it differently) are merging.

Our friend David Weild, former vice-chair at the Nasdaq and current market-structure expert at Grant Thornton said of the impending deal: “Scale, scale, scale.” Duncan Niederauer, expected to lead the combined entity, said today: “This is an industry that lends itself to scale.” It seems that what began here in 1792 under the Buttonwood Tree at the foot of Wall Street is at an end of sorts. Why?

Businesses need scale when markets are commoditized and currencies debased. But beyond that, it’s the result of monumental revitalization of the over-the-counter market. Big brokers are trading with each other, avoiding exchanges. And because they are experts at managing risk, institutions choose them not just for execution but as counterparties for transferring risk from asset class to asset class. This is fast becoming the main reason that natural liquidity – trading lingua franca for shares not driven by high-speed intermediaries – moves around. (more…)

Trading Goes Beyond the Edge

We were in Lake Jackson, TX, last week for Karen’s HS reunion. South Texas is a sweat lodge this time of year, but the Saint Augustine grass lies lush and luminescent under the sycamores and live oaks. And we saw not one tar ball on Surfside Beach in Freeport.

A word on trading: We expected money to move after options expirations, but changes to program-trading plans came early, on July 14, we observed in the data. So with expirations July 15-16, markets were shellacked when money shifted to other assets. The past two days have given us massive arbitrage around this shift and ahead of tomorrow’s volatility expirations. Thus, the week could end on a rough note, we fear. (more…)