Tagged: Euro

Fade the Move

Have you seen that car commercial with the bearded guy?

The car chimes when you should check the tires. To drive the point home, as it were, we viewers see our bearded fellow getting hired and, as the new boss extends a hand, going overboard with the handshake – until he hears the chime. Then he’s readying with cologne for a date and when he’s about to squirt a supply netherward, the chime stops him. He’s going in for a goodnight kiss with overmuch gusto. Chime.

The chime says fade the move.

Fading the move would be a great name for a rock band. It’s a currency-trading term that means “when your dough moves sharply, be ready for a shift back and re-weight accordingly.”

It caught my eye Tuesday early when faulty Spanish bond data caused a sharp shudder in the euro, which dropped like a stone, juicing the dollar. Adam Cole, currency analyst at RBC quoted in a Marketwatch blog, said that absent a better explanation, “We would suggest fading the move.”

Fading the move abounds in your stock. You announce a big contract win that should add something to multiples of forward cash flow, and in your trading data, speculators are fading the move.

Why? How’d the euro – a global currency second only to the dollar! – juke on jived Spanish bond data? Machines. (more…)

The Theory of Value Relativity

There’s an old stock market joke. Every time one person sells, another buys, and they both think they’re smart.

Value is relative. And yet. Anybody in the IR chair pencils valuations for his or her shares. Isn’t this the battle – measuring value? Karen and I on a recent trip sat with a sharp IR pro who explained how the team had an internal valuation model for company stock.

Many consider historical price-to-earnings ratios of the S&P 500 (about 16 over 130 years but ranging from below 9 in 1933 and 1983, to 40-plus in 2000, the record). Some like the S&P earnings yield versus 10-year Treasurys (7% to 2%). On that basis, markets would seem to be a whopping good buy.

And yet the Dow was down 500 points in five days through Tuesday.

There are three immutable valuation meters. You’ve got future value of cash flows. For instance, somebody at Facebook determined that Instagram’s future cash flows discounted to present value are worth $1 billion rather than the current figure of zero.

There’s net worth. When Microsoft bought AOL patents this week for $1 billion, the market added the cash to AOL’s net worth and shares shot up about 20%. (more…)

Arbitragers Love Monetary Intervention

Say you were playing poker.

I don’t mean gambling, but real cards. You’re engaged with some seriousness. You’re watching how you bet and when, reading the players ahead and after you.

Then The House starts doling out stacks of chips. Would you play more or less cautiously if you had free chips?

Apply this thinking to equity markets, IR folks. In trading data, we saw European money sweeping into US equities Nov 28. Why did markets trembling Nov 25 decide by the following Monday to up the ante in risk-taking? Primary dealers implementing policy for global central banks also drive most program-trading strategies.

Thus, European money surmised that central banks would intervene, and their behavior reflected it. The rest caught on, and markets soared Nov 30 on free chips from central banks. It was short-lived. By Dec 2, we saw institutions market-wide assaying portfolio risk and locking in higher derivatives insurance. The chips were gone.

Money sat back expectantly. On Dec 8, The House delivered chips as the European Central Bank lowered interest rates. That’s devaluing the euro. At first, cheapening the euro increases the value of the dollar – which lowers US stocks (a la Dec 8). But if you’d hedged with derivatives as most of the globe did, you bluffed The House. Plus, the Fed will likely have to follow Europe’s bet up with a see-and-raise to devalue the dollar back into line with the euro (expect it next week, but before options expirations).

In poker, having “the nuts” is holding the best cards, and knowing it. Central banks have given arbitragers the nuts. (more…)

A Rational View of Share Prices

Belated Happy Thanksgiving!

After breaking for a week as an act of giving thanks, we’re back. Karen and I joined 88,622 others in Aggieland at Kyle Field in College Station for the A&M football game last Thursday versus the Texas Longhorns. Disappointing outcome, great Thanksgiving.

There’s something special about Texas. People passing you on the street say hi and the kids say yes ma’am and yes sir. There’s a lot of what Kenny Chesney calls “the good stuff.” What may be the world’s greatest college bar, the Dixie Chicken, sits on the main College Station drag like an Old West saloon. Batwing doors, even.

Speaking of swinging doors, gyrations in markets make it awfully hard to use your stock price to measure investor sentiment (wasn’t that the idea behind exchanges?). In fact, there’s inherent contradiction between the way markets behave now and how the IR profession cultivates holders.

IR folks typically seek buy-and-hold money that does not trade. Yet executives frequently ask about the stock price. The news rushing at us round the clock tries to explain market behavior in rational terms. Yet stock prices are set by the latest fleeting bid or offer. Nine of ten times, those prices are not rational. (more…)

Yin and Yang in Your Stock

Stocks go up and down. Nothing new there.

The dollar dropped for a second straight day today. Stocks are again up, like they were yesterday. The dollar gained ground last Wed-Fri, and stocks fell.

This week marks the end of the month and quarter. We recommend in our IR Calendar that you consider some tactical timing as part of your overall IR strategy. Generally, the last few trading days of a quarter or month aren’t best for releasing good news. But they may be perfect for bad news.

Why? Institutions will be shoring up portfolio returns or managing exposure to market risk. They address risk by offsetting it with something that is inversely correlated. Notice that stocks and the dollar are inversely correlated. Notice that the dollar and other currencies, such as the Euro, are often inversely correlated. (more…)