Tagged: Fast Traders

March 17: The machination of machines!

Couldn’t blame you if you missed it.

 

For many, these past few weeks and the ones coming up are the busiest on the IR calendar. Board presentations, ASMs, virtual analyst conferences and investor days. You just finish year-end events and Q1 reporting is rushing at you.

 

Maybe you missed last week’s Market Structure Map. Tim Quast did an excellent job sharing our most-up-to-date view on how the Market works. If you missed it you can find it at: modernir.com/msm – it’s worth revisiting and sharing with your entire IR team, including the senior-most members of your investor and media facing IR team.

 

If you are a regular reader, you may have already considered putting constraints on no-longer preeminent sell-siders (data show their primary audience – yes, including still important long-term institutional holders – Active Investment in our parlance – consistently reflects less than 9.5 percent of all trading Market wide.

 

…with all respect and due appreciation to Python (Monty) Pictures.

No today, even after the recent storied, but largely isolated uptick in retail day trader influence – its machines, acting far faster with mathematical indifference driving the pricing for nearly, if not all equities. These Fast Traders – collocated to exchange computers running increasingly tactical algorithms (53 percent of all trading in the S&P500® last week) are no longer simple amplifiers of nuanced investor behavior, they search the web for data and reference points, trading both agnostically to whether it moves your equity price up or down and increasingly with intent to seemingly do just that.

 

Similar algorithmic behaviors now amplify the trading of the contextually correct, but perhaps inferentially misleading Passive Investment segment (last week: 20 percent of all Market trading). Regular readers know our growing focus on ETF-related trading that has now come to dominate this category.

 

Certainly many traditional index funds and indexed asset allocators continue to hold major positions in our companies, but any material trading is typically around known re-balancing events – like the twice annual S&P Global™ indices re-weighting, next, after this Friday’s close.

 

ETF plan sponsors on the other hand have grown increasingly “active” in their trading behaviors. Strategic sector weighting shifts, tax-related selling, and the use of machine-driven trading seemingly more common. Their influence frequently lifts Passive Investment to the Key Behavior in client’s Market Structure reports.

 

The Market has traded with some volatility recently in anticipation of monthly option expirations – not at all unusual; our calendar of such events should be a key input in your Investor Relations planning efforts and is available here – call us to learn how to avoid calendar missteps.

 

Today begins the cycle of monthly option expirations. First the widely followed CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) index. Thursday, AM-settled options expire, mostly index products. Friday brings the main events. March single stock options, single stock futures, stock index options and stock index futures all expire Friday – a so called, “quadruple witching” day. This happens just once a quarter.

 

A wide gamut of Market participants including – model-driven ETF sponsors, Hedge Funds, derivative traders, etc., with expiring options or futures positions must decide how to redeploy funds this week.

 

Little to do with fundamental business performance or valuations, the increased volume and volatility of these routine Market events queue exaggerated machine trading and can meaningfully impact the trading and response to your Investor Relations outreach and messaging. Good news often gets lost. The impact of less good news – often amplified. Its important to know what’s making the difference. Ask us how.

 

PD Grueber

IS REPORTING NOW JUST A SIDESHOW?

“Looking good, Valentine!” “Feeling good, Louis!” A gentleman’s bet. But maybe not so fast.

Farce met Street last week with good reason distracting many in the Finance and public company arenas. Far better chronicled elsewhere (here a good one on Benzinga’s Monday Pre-Market Prep – pls skip the clunky ad), but this weekend I couldn’t resist the parallels to 1983’s Trading Places – I’ll leave you to Twitter, your browser or favorite streaming service and bring the focus to Market Structure.

With all rights to Messrs. Russo, Landis, Harris, Weingrod, Aykroyd, Murphy, Ms. Curtis and Paramount, et al.

We start February with a significant percentage of our clients yet to report quarterly and year-end results and to confirm their forward-looking expectations. Tough challenge in a Market seemingly growing more disinterested.

No question your IR team is working long hours with counselors and non-public facing finance, accounting and marketing coworkers to develop a cogent, clear message, to tie-out results and craft outlook statements and public disclosures; all too often, a thankless job.

It doesn’t help that the Market and the trading in individual equities are seemingly chaotic and unpredictable. But are they? As a subscriber you’re likely conversant in Market Structure – our view of the Market here at ModernIR (if no, read on and please reach out to our Zach Yeager to set up a demo). So like the polar bear swimmers here in Minnesota let’s dive in – we’ll be quick.

Here’s how the Market has evolved in the first month of 2021 – changes in the demographics of trading:

Note the Passive Investment retreat – would have been fair to expect the opposite with all the month-end true-ups for ETFs, Index and Quant Funds – but it’s a repeating month-end behavior recently followed by buying. The surge of volatility arose from increased Fast Trading – machine-driven High Frequency trading, and yes, some Retail day trading.

Both categories are largely populated by algorithmically driven trading platforms; “Passive” (a largely  anachronistic designation – and far from it or the buy and hold strategies the name conjures) today constantly recalibrate collateral holdings with dominate behaviors suggesting little long-term primary focus. “Fast Trading” – pure execution speed, volume-based trading; its goal beyond vast incremental profits – no overnight balance sheet exposure.

Short Volume trading rather than building, declined and Sentiment remained persistently positive (5.0 = Neutral) and never negative. Does this sound disorganized? For forces dominating early Q1/21 equity trading this was a strong, dynamic and likely very profitable period.

The cruel truth – machine trading is no gentlemen’s bet. Brilliant in execution, these efforts have one goal – to game inherent trading advantages over slower moving Market participants – folks that demand conference calls, executive time, build and tie-out spreadsheet models and trade in non-Market-disruptive fashion – the traditional IR audience. The system rewards this – topic for another time.

From a pure trading standpoint, traders behind 9 out 10 trades in the final day of January trading placed minimal value on traditional IR efforts as their bots rocket through Short Seller reports and quarterly management call transcripts, scan real-time news feeds and playbacks for tradable intonation in your executives’ delivery and make mathematical judgments about the first 100 words of each press release.

As IR professionals its incumbent that we, rather than be demoralized by the evolution and dominance of short-term trading, engage, and become intimately versed in these data and these Market realities. The competitive advantage is in understanding and minimizing false conclusions in decision-making. Management and the constituents of long-term investors – yes, they are still legion – and expect no less.

Let us show you how.

Perry Grueber filling in for Tim Quast

  

 

Time Changes

Public companies, are you still reporting financial results like it’s 1995?

Back then, Tim Koogle and team at Yahoo! made it a mission to be first, showing acuity at closing the books for the quarter faster than the rest. Thousands turned out for the call and – a whiz-bang new thing – webcast.

Ah, yesteryear and its influence.  It’s still setting time for us all.  No, really.  Benjamin Franklin penned a 1784 letter to a Parisian periodical claiming his experiments showed sunlight was available the moment the sun rose and if only Parisians could get out of bed earlier instead of rising late and staying up, they could save immense sums on candles.

Some say his levity gave rise to the notion of Daylight Savings Time. A closer look suggests it was the Canadians.  Sure, scientist George Hudson of the Wellington Philosophical Society presented an 1895 paper saying New Zealand would improve its industry by turning clocks forward two hours in October, back two in March.

But the occupants of Thunder Bay in northern Ontario first shifted time forward in 1908.

What do Canada and New Zealand have in common besides language and erstwhile inclusion in a British empire upon which the sun never set?  They’re at extreme latitudes where light and dark swing mightily.

The push to yank clocks back and forth swept up much of the planet during World War I in an effort to reduce fuel-consumption.

Here in Denver we’re neither at war and hoarding tallow nor gripping a planetary light-bending polar cap in mittened hands.  So why do we cling to an anachronistic practice?

Speaking of which, in 1995 when the internet throngs hung on every analog and digital word from the Yahoo! executive fearsome foursome (at least threesome), most of the money in the market was Active Investment. That was 24 years ago.

Back then, investor-relations pros wanted to be sellside analysts making the big bucks like Mary Meeker and Henry Blodget. Now the sellsiders want to be IR pros because few hang on its words today like it was EF Hutton and the jobs and checks have gone away.

Volume is run by machines. The majority of assets under management are Passive, paying no attention to results. Three firms own nearly 30% of all equities. Thousands of Exchange Traded Funds have turned capital markets into arbitrage foot races that see earnings only as anomalies to exploit. Fast Traders set most of the bids and offers and don’t want to own anything. And derivatives bets are the top way to play earnings.

By the way, I’m moderating a panel on market structure for the NIRI Virtual Chapter Nov 20 with Joe Saluzzi and Mett Kinak. We’ll discuss what every IRO, board member and executive should understand about how the market works.

Today 50% of trades are less than 100 shares.  Over 85% of volume is a form of arbitrage (versus a benchmark, underlying stocks, derivatives, prices elsewhere).

Active Investment is the smallest slice of daily trading. Why would we do what we did in 1995 when it was the largest force?

Here are three 21st century Rules for Reporting:

Rule #1: Don’t report results during options-expirations.  In Feb 2019 Goldman Sachs put out a note saying the top trading strategy during earnings season was buying five-day out of the money calls. That is, buy the rights (it was 1996 when OMC offered that same advice in a song called How Bizarre.). Sell them before earnings. This technique, Goldman said, produced an average 88% return in the two preceding quarters.

How? If calls can be bought for $1.20 and sold for $2.25, that’s an 88% return.  But it’s got nothing to do with your results, or rational views of your price.

The closer to expirations, the cheaper and easier the arbitrage trade. Report AFTER expirations. Stop reporting in the middle of them. And don’t report at the ends of months. Passives are truing up tracking then. Here’s our IR Planning Calendar.

Rule #2: Be unpredictable, not predictable.  Arbitrage schemes depend on three factors: price, volatility, and time. Time equals WHEN you report. If you always publish dates at the same time in advance, you pitch a fastball straight down the middle over the plate, letting speculative sluggers slam it right over the fence.

Stop doing that. Vary it. Better, be vague. You can let your holders and analysts know via email, then put out an advisory the day of earnings pointing to your website.  Comply with the rules – but don’t serve speculators.

Rule #3: Know your market structure and measure it before and after results to shape message beforehand and internal feedback afterward. The bad news about mathematical markets is they’re full of arbitragers.  The good news is math is a perfect grid for us to measure with machines. We can see everything the money is doing.

If we can, you can (use our analytics!).  If you can know every day what sets your price, how it may move with results, whether there are massive synthetic short bets queued up and looming over your press release, well…why wouldn’t you want to know?

Let’s do 21st century IR. No need to burn tallow like cave dwellers. Go Modern. It’s time.