Tagged: FOMC

Money for Nothing

How much does free money cost?

Everything, apparently.

The play Hamilton by Lin Manuel Miranda has grossed over $620 million, seventh all-time on Broadway but still a long way from Phantom of the Opera, Wicked, and Lion King, theater’s billion-dollar trio.

Hamilton is about Alexander, our first Treasury Secretary and the man behind the first bank of the United States, now the Federal Reserve Bank, which concludes its Open Market Committee meeting today.

Hamilton’s generous pen proliferates in the Federalist Papers, required reading for any serious defender of the republic.

In Federalist 78, Hamilton wrote that while it’s a republican axiom that the people may alter or abolish the Constitution if it’s inconsistent with their happiness, no momentary inclination laying hold of a majority of constituents justifies departure from it unless or until the people have by solemn act approved it.

My governor here in CO issued an order shutting down the economy, citing the emergency powers in Article IV Section 2 of the CO Constitution. I read it.  There are no emergency powers. It says the governor is the chief executive.

I sent a note to his chief of staff, Eve Lieberman, saying that not only had the governor construed meaning from the Constitution that it doesn’t contain, but that he also had overlooked Article II, which among other things says that all political power derives from the people, and that all persons have certain natural, essential and inalienable rights, among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; of acquiring, possessing and protecting property; and of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.

If the governor suspends these by decree and uses the power of the police to enforce it, is he suspending the Constitution and imposing martial law?

I didn’t get an answer.

I’ve got a point about markets, the Fed and this country post-Pandemic. Stay with me.  You may disagree, but I’ll say it anyway.

People with political power and the best intentions reasoned that we could not have sick and dying people. Maybe that’s the ultimate ideal. It’s not in the US Constitution or any of the 50 state Constitutions.

It should not evade the collective conscience of this free people that the rule of law was suspended.  What should we do next time?  The political power, if not the will, is ours.

Let’s get to The Fed. The only reason we could realize the high self-actualized ideal of switching off the economy was because of the promise of free money.  If the Fed couldn’t write the checks, the economy couldn’t shut down.  Period.

I’ve told this story before: When we visited her hometown of Lake Jackson, TX for a school reunion, the fathers of two of Karen’s high-school classmates related vignettes to me about their grandfathers from the 19th century.

The grandfathers were about 12 years old each when their sharecropper parents told them, “We can’t afford you.  Here’s a lunch and our last silver dollar. Seek your fortune.”

Both went west. One become a big West Texas rancher, the other a wealthy Galveston mercantilist. Both sent their kids to school, and they in turn sent theirs to college.

And those kids were these fathers, now in their 70s, both college-educated, wealthy retired Dow Chemical executives.

The Fed’s balance sheet is now $6.6 trillion, laden with government debt, private mortgages, and soon high-yield-debt-backed Exchange Traded Funds, even facilities buying municipal debts, underwriting direct-lending to businesses and consumers.

The cost of free money is bigger than you think.  It’s the lost spirit of a 12-year-old on his own.  It’s liberty and the rule of law.

And free money is worth less than you suppose. My grandparents and parents never had mortgages or car payments and they concluded life with wealth as blue-collar farmers and ranchers. My grandfather bought his first house for $500.  Built his next on two acres for $5,500, sold that one in 1980 for $55,000.

I bought my first house for $370,000.  Sold that first house for $800,000.

Inflation. If we keep creating money to solve problems, it buys less and less, so you need more and more until there isn’t enough to retire on and we need unemployment of 3% instead of 10-12% just to keep it all going. And checks from the Fed for any crisis.

We are bleeding ourselves dry, ostensibly for our financial health, just like doctors once bled patients to make them well.

The stock market will buy free money – until suddenly it doesn’t. Japan stopped believing (despite rock band Journey’s anthemic counterargument).  The stock market there, the Nikkei, was nearly twice as high in 1990 than it is now.

It takes almost unimaginable character today to hand somebody a lunch and a dollar and say you’re on your own.  Yet it’s the strait and narrow way to wealth.

It’s never too late to change what we’re doing.  Can we give up free money and become rich again?

Expectations vs Outcomes

“Earnings beat expectations but revenues missed.”

Variations on this theme pervade the business airwaves here during earnings, currently at fever pitch.  Stocks bounce around in response. Soaring heights, crushing depths, and instances where stocks moved opposite of what the company expected.

Why?

Well, everyone is doing it – betting on expectations versus outcomes.  The Federal Reserve Open Market Committee meeting wraps today and much musing and a lot of financial betting swirls around what Chair Yellen is expected to offer as outcome.

Then Friday the world stops at 8:30am ET, holding its breath to see if the expectation for April US jobs matches the outcome.

And by the way, I will join Rick Santelli in Chicago Thursday morning, in between, on Squawk on the Street to pontificate fleetingly and I hope meaningfully.

Obsession with expectations versus outcomes in equity markets and across the planar vastness of economic and monetary data blots out long-term vision and fixes attention on directional bets.

It’s not investment. And it’s no way to plan the future, this mass financial pirouette around a data point.  But it’s the market we’ve got. We must understand it, like it or not.

Back to your stock. The reason that after you beat and raise your stock falls is what occurred ahead of your call.

It may have nothing to do with how you performed versus consensus. For proof, droves from the sellside are looking for IR jobs because trillions of dollars migrating from active portfolios into indexes and ETFs aren’t using sellside research. Or listening to calls.

It reminds me of the Roadrunner cartoons, Wile E. Coyote running off the cliff. Remember? Parts of Wile E. drop in order, the last thing remaining, his blinking eyes.

That’s to me like results versus consensus.  The eyes of Wile E. Coyote, last vestige of something fallen off the cliff of colossal change to investment and trading behavior. The sellside still has everybody thinking outcomes versus expectations matter to investors.

No, they matter to the hordes with directional bets – over 40% of the market.

They bet long or short, or on the spread between high and low prices. They may have fixed for floating swaps that pay if you beat, leading counterparties to sell your shares – and the bettors are short your stock too, so they make a fee on the bet and more covering as your stock falls.

And the CEO says to you, “What the heck?”

If your stock is 50% short (we measure it) and slamming the ceiling of Sentiment due to a marketwide derivatives surge after expirations – which happened Apr 24-25 – it doesn’t matter if you crush consensus. Structure trumps Story. Price will fall because bets have already paid thanks to the broad market.

The market makes sense when you understand what sets price.

Active investment leads less than 20% of the time. The juggernaut of indexes and ETFs rumbles through at about 34%, and it’s now distorting share-borrowing and Risk Management. The latter is 13-16% of your market cap – hopes for the future that can sour or surge on any little data point.

Let’s bring it back to the Fed and jobs and the economy. I said your stock will move based on what happened beforehand.  That can be a day or two, or a week or two.

The economy is massive. It will move on what happened beforehand too but the arc is years. No matter what may be occurring now, which in turn will manifest in the future.

The threat to the US economy and stocks is a lack of appreciation that tomorrow is a consequence of yesterday, not of tomorrow.  For the better part of a decade, furious fiscal and monetary effort promoted borrowing and spending so people would consume more.

But the consequence of borrowing and spending is debt and a lack of money. Which causes the economy to contract in the future. Stocks are pumped on past steroids. If the economy beats and raises, everything can still fall because of what happened yesterday.

We must first navigate consequences of yesterday before reaching the fruits from today.

Same for you. The stock market is awash in bets on divergences, even more when financial results mean opportunity blooms. Your active money clangs around in there, often as confused as you.

Your challenge and opportunity, IR professionals? Helping management develop an expectation of market form that matches the outcome of its function now.

The Short Fed Story

Is the Federal Reserve fueling stock-market gains?

When St. Louis Fed president James Bullard addressed the Bowling Green, KY, Chamber of Commerce in February 2011, he pinpointed correlation between Ben Bernanke’s September 2010 Jackson Hole speech on “QE2,” the Fed’s second easy-money program, and the stock-market rebound that followed. Classical effects of monetary easing include rising equity prices, Mr. Bullard said.

The Fed wanted market appreciation because people feel better when the stuff they own seems more valuable. But I think we’re having the wrong debate. The question isn’t if Fed intervention increases stock prices, but this: Can prices set by middle men last?

Before actor Daniel Craig became the new James Bond he starred in a caper flick called Layer Cake that posited a rubric: The art of the deal is being a good middle man. The Fed is the ultimate global middle man. Since the dollar is the world’s reserve currency, the Fed as night manager of the cost and availability of dollars can affect everybody’s money. After all, save where barter still prevails, doing business involves money. Variability in its value is the fulcrum for the great planetary teeter-totter of commerce. The risk for the Fed is distorting global values with borrowing and intermediation.

In the stock market, we’re told it’s been a terrible year for “the shorts” – speculators who borrow shares and sell them on hopes of covering at a lower future price. The common measure is short interest, a twice-monthly metric denoting stocks borrowed, sold, and not yet covered. Historically, that’s about 5% of shares comprising the S&P 500. (more…)

Big Tick Talk

We all love soaring markets. When were you last dead sure what drove your stock up?

Today, a German court will decide if German taxpayers must back last week’s European Central Bank plan to buy Eurozone debt, which powered US equities to multi-year highs Sept 6. Stocks have moved higher since, with the dollar at May lows. What that court says may prompt stocks to swoop or swoon.

Thursday the 13th, Ben Bernanke speaks after the Federal Reserve’s monthly Open Market Committee meeting. That may boost stocks too, or disappoint them.

By the way, Friday I speak (having zero macro impact) to the IR council for MAPI, the manufacturer’s alliance, on “what lies beneath” market structure today. See you at the Intercontinental in Chicago.

Next week is huge. Options expire, quarterly rebalances to S&P indexes take place, and important European bond auctions go off – all between Sept 19-21. Correlation between the US dollar index and the S&P 500 is nearly symmetrical to late April’s when we warned clients of an imminent market retreat. Stocks then declined a thousand points over several weeks until the dollar in July began its longest slide since the Flash Crash. Beware risks.

In the data, evidence abounds. We’ve seen stocks curiously leap ex-dividend, whole peer groups shoot up 15%, and random shares move double digits up or down in two days without regard to the market or the peer group. Global statistical arbitrage – using math to calculate trading spreads globally – is rampant in behaviors, including the normally “rational” slice. As high as we’ve ever seen. (more…)

The Epic Divide

Thrilling. Arduous. Rewarding. Draining. Spectacular.

No, not the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee meeting concluding today with a soliloquy before public microphones from the chairman.

We mean our grand cycling adventure riding the Rockies on the high backbone of the fruited plain last week. After 1,500 training miles we clocked several hundred more and about 25,000 vertical feet climbing a collection of the globe’s great mountain passes. The desire accomplished is sweet to the soul (one of my favorite sayings because it reflects the human spirit). Here are Independence Pass, the rim of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison, atop Ute Pass northwest of Silverthorne, and aspens outside Aspen.

Speaking of epic, NIRI this year again reminded me about the divide between how markets work now and – take no offense, it’s just a refrain from IR pros – what most of us know about them.

Here’s a current example. Why were prices and markets swinging wildly Tuesday, with disparity between major measures and extreme moves in stocks? Rational investment? Most of us intuitively know investors aren’t responsible.

What is? Fluctuating currencies, yes (hour-by-hour now). But did you know that VIX futures expire today? Last Thursday and Friday, other options and futures expired, and S&P indexes rebalanced.

Behaviorally, expirations are seismic (we study trading behaviors at a mathematical level) because trading is global, 24-hour, and multi-asset-class. When an instrument like a futures contract expires, there’s a ripple effect. (more…)

What “Money” Means Now

It’s almost Thanksgiving, and the sun-splashed snow along Denver’s South Pearl Street is festive! Groping for reflective thoughts this holiday season we found humorist Dave Barry’s mother, who told him these immortal words long ago: “Son, it’s better to be rich and happy than poor and sick.” As Dave Barry observed, “That makes sense, even in these troubled times.”

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