Tagged: forex

Fade the Move

Have you seen that car commercial with the bearded guy?

The car chimes when you should check the tires. To drive the point home, as it were, we viewers see our bearded fellow getting hired and, as the new boss extends a hand, going overboard with the handshake – until he hears the chime. Then he’s readying with cologne for a date and when he’s about to squirt a supply netherward, the chime stops him. He’s going in for a goodnight kiss with overmuch gusto. Chime.

The chime says fade the move.

Fading the move would be a great name for a rock band. It’s a currency-trading term that means “when your dough moves sharply, be ready for a shift back and re-weight accordingly.”

It caught my eye Tuesday early when faulty Spanish bond data caused a sharp shudder in the euro, which dropped like a stone, juicing the dollar. Adam Cole, currency analyst at RBC quoted in a Marketwatch blog, said that absent a better explanation, “We would suggest fading the move.”

Fading the move abounds in your stock. You announce a big contract win that should add something to multiples of forward cash flow, and in your trading data, speculators are fading the move.

Why? How’d the euro – a global currency second only to the dollar! – juke on jived Spanish bond data? Machines. (more…)

Facing the Book Facts

My flight today to Cincinnati through Atlanta froze in the blizzard of lost travel dreams. Which proved fortuitous, as I was able to skip Atlanta and flight straight to Cincinnati, saving me five hours. I love blizzards.

Speaking of sharing personal details, Facebook is the biggest entrepreneurial deal of the current day. It’s also a focal point for the widening divide between public markets and growth enterprises. Facebook may or may not go public. If it does, much of its prodigious progress will already have been funded, and the public markets will serve more as a wealth-transfer device than a capital-raising tool.

It’s a microcosm for investor relations. Speaking of speaking, I’m at the NIRI Tri-State Chapter tomorrow for what I have assured my hosts will be a riveting exploration of how to be cool in an IR seat heated to silliness by transient trading. Hope to see you locals there, by sled, snowmobile or telemark!

Anyway, according to the stock-market newsletter Crosscurrents, the average holding time for institutional positions is now 2.8 months. “The theory that buy-and-hold was the superior way to ensure gains over the long term, has been ditched completely in favor of technology,” writes Alan Newman, its author. (more…)