Tagged: Knight Capital Group

The Auction

Boo!

What a Halloween week. To our many friends, clients and colleagues on the Atlantic seaboard assailed by Hurricane Sandy, we in Denver are rushing sunshine your direction.

Exchanges are hoping for sunshine too as trading resumes. It hinges on opening auctions. That gives us the creepy-crawlies, as though black cats were crisscrossing ahead as we ducked from ladder to ladder to avoid the falling sky.

Why? BATS Exchange saw its IPO torpedoed when the opening auction went awry. Flaws in the Facebook opening auction at the Nasdaq delayed quotes, and the fiasco lingers in recriminations and lawsuits. Knight Capital Group had bad software derail an algorithm hitting opening auctions.

We should note “closing auctions” too, since trading days begin and end with them. Some, like the Nasdaq, call them the opening and closing “cross” – not as though it’s catechism but because of what happens.

As Sandy stomped through Long Island Sound, the big equity exchanges including NYSE, Nasdaq, Direct Edge and BATS, were plotting how to get a good auction going today to restart markets dormant since Friday.

Now, stay with me. We have one aim: To explain why the Halloween auction is vital – and risky – and why auctions are both linchpins to price-discovery and the market’s Achilles Heel. (more…)

Knight Time

Some were forced to do it themselves.

In the wake of Knight Capital’s technology glitch – if you missed it, a linchpin in trading markets was nearly undone Aug 1 by faulty trading software – some brokers who normally route order flow to Knight for handling had to execute their own trades.

They’re not as good at it. No question. But a curious thing happened. We observed a measurable increase in share of market for rational money. More volume acted like rational investment the days following.

Why? How? Today, money often puts compliance before investment considerations. Say you’re a mid-tier broker-dealer whose client is a small Midwest municipal pension fund. The fund puts a modest percentage of resources into a trading portfolio and directs trades to you because your firm’s president golfs Fridays with the mayor.

Before we continue, breaking news: I’m in New Orleans next week to sit down with JOE SALUZZI, co-author of Broken Markets, for a candid chat on what ails markets today. I’m also moderating a wild brawl of a panel discussion on the hot topics in IR today. If you’re not in the Big Easy next week, well…you’re not where you should be.

Back to our story. Market rules require that you as a broker execute trades in something similar to the amount of time that Morgan Stanley does, which is hard to do without more risk to your firm’s capital base (meaning your money takes the other side of trades if nobody else is there). Face it. A family brokerage in Bloomington, IL, isn’t going to host its servers right next to the Nasdaq’s in Trumbull, CT, like Morgan Stanley. (more…)

Trading Goes Beyond the Edge

We were in Lake Jackson, TX, last week for Karen’s HS reunion. South Texas is a sweat lodge this time of year, but the Saint Augustine grass lies lush and luminescent under the sycamores and live oaks. And we saw not one tar ball on Surfside Beach in Freeport.

A word on trading: We expected money to move after options expirations, but changes to program-trading plans came early, on July 14, we observed in the data. So with expirations July 15-16, markets were shellacked when money shifted to other assets. The past two days have given us massive arbitrage around this shift and ahead of tomorrow’s volatility expirations. Thus, the week could end on a rough note, we fear. (more…)