Tagged: Options Expirations

Times and Seasons

You need examples.

I was wishing a longtime friend who turns 50 Sep 20 a happy what they call on Game of Thrones “Name Day,” and it called to mind those words. We were college freshmen 31 years ago – how time flies – and I thought back to my Logic and Philosophy professor.

He’d say in his thick Greek accent, “You need examples.  You cannot illustrate anything well with merely theory, nor can you prove something without support.”

In the stock market, examples are vital for separating theory from fact. And for helping investor-relations professionals and investors alike move past thinking “the market is complicated so my eyes glaze over” to realizing it’s just a grocery store for stocks.

With a rigid set of prescribed rules for consumers.  You can watch consumers comply. Some race around the store grabbing this or that. Others mosey the aisles loading the cart.

Timing plays a huge role. It’s not random.

I’ll give you an example.  Monday I was trading notes with a client whose shares are Overbought, pegging ten on our 10-point Sentiment scale, and 65% short.

Okay, here we go. What does “Overbought” mean? Let’s use an analogy. You know I love using spinach, right.  Overbought means all the spinach on the grocery store shelf is gone.  If the store is out of spinach, people stop consuming spinach.

What alone can override an overbought spinach market is willingness to pay UP for more spinach by driving to another store. Most consumers won’t. They’ll buy something else.

All analogies break down but you see the point?  We can measure the interplay of price and behaviors in shares so we know when they’re Overbought, Oversold, or about right — Neutral.

Now let’s introduce timing into the equation.  Monday was the one day all month with new options on stocks and other securities officially trading.  Our example stock was up 4%.  Yet it’s Overbought and 65% short.

What’s “65% short?”  That means 65% of trading volume is coming from borrowed shares. Traders are borrowing and selling shares every day to profit on short-term price-changes. It’s more than half the trading volume.

A quick and timely aside here:  We were in Chicago Friday for the NIRI chapter’s annual IR Workshop and the last panel – an awesome one spearheaded by Snap-On’s Leslie Kratcoski, an IR superstar – included the head of prime brokerage for BNP Paribas.  Among many other things, prime brokers lend securities. BNP is also a big derivatives counterparty.

Those elements dovetail in our example. The stock was Overbought and 65% short yet soared 4% yesterday. Short squeeze (forced buying), yes. But we now know WHY.

News didn’t drive price up 4%.  It was a classic case of big moves, no news. One could cast about and come up with something indirect. But let’s understand how the grocery store for your shares continuously reveals purpose.

The CONDITIONS necessary for the stock to move up 4% existed BEFORE the move.  This is why it’s vital to measure consistently.  If you’re not measuring, you’re guessing.

Why would the stock soar with new options trading?  There is demand for derivatives tied to the company’s stock. Parties short had to buy in – cover positions.  Why? Because the counterparty needed shares to back new derivatives positions (naked puts or calls are much riskier).

The stock jumped 4% because that’s how much higher the price had to move to bring new spinach, so to speak, into the market, the grocery store. Nobody wanted to sell at current prices – the stock was Overbought. Up 4%, sellers were induced to offer shares.

On any other day of the month these events would not have coalesced. I suspect hedge funds behind the bets had no idea their cloak of secrecy would be yanked off.

Once you spend a little time measuring and understanding the market, you can know in a minute or two what’s setting price. And now we know to watch into October expirations because hedge funds have made a sizeable bet, likely up (if they’re wrong they’ll be sellers ahead of expirations – and we’ll watch short volume).

Speaking of timing, options expirations for September wraps officially today with VIX and other volatility trades lapsing. The market has been on a tear. Come Thu-Fri, we’ll get a first taste of autumn.  Next week brings window-dressing for the month and quarter.

Our Sentiment Index marked a double top through expirations. About 80% of the time, an up market into expirations is a down market after, and with surging Sentiment, down could be dramatic say five or so trading days from now.

You’ll have to tell me how it goes! Karen and I are off to mark time riding bikes from Munich to Salzburg through the Bavarian Alps, a way to measure my impending 50th birthday next month.  We call it The Four B’s:  Beer, bread, brats and bikes. We’ll report back the week of Oct 9.

Turnover

Earnings season.

Late nights for IR professionals crafting corporate messages for press releases and call scripts. Early mornings on CNBC’s Squawk Box, the company CEO explaining what the beat or miss means.

One thing still goes lacking in the equation forming market expectations for 21st century stocks: How money behaves. Yesterday for instance the health care sector was down nearly 2%. Some members were off 10%. It must be poor earnings, right?

FactSet in its most recent Earnings Insight with 10% of the S&P out (that’ll jump this week) says 100% of the health care sector is above estimates. That makes no sense, you say. Buy the rumor, sell the news?

There are a lot of market aphorisms that don’t match facts.  One of our longtime clients, a tech member of the S&P 500, pre-announced Oct 15 and shares are down 20%.  “The moral of the story,” lamented the IR officer, an expert on market structure (who still doesn’t always win the timing argument), “is you don’t report during options-expirations.”

She’s right, and she knew what would happen. The old rule is you do the same thing every time so investors see consistency. The new rule is know your audience. According to the Investment Company Institute (ICI), weighted turnover in institutional investments – frequency of selling – is about 42%.  Less than half of held assets move during the year.

That matches the objectives of investor-targeting, which is to attract money that buys and holds. It does.  In mutual funds, which still have the most money, turnover is near 29% according to the ICI.

So if you’re focused on long-term investors, why do you report results during options-expirations when everybody leveraging derivatives is resetting positions?  That’s like commencing a vital political speech as a freight train roars by.  Everybody would look around and wonder what the heck you said.

I found a 2011 Vanguard document that in the fine print on page one says turnover in its mutual funds averages 35% versus 1,800% in its ETFs.

Do you understand? ETFs churn assets 34 more times than your long-term holders. Since 1997 when there were just $7 billion of assets in ETFs, these instruments have grown 41% annually for 18 straight years!  Mutual funds?  Just 5% and in fact for ten straight years money has moved out of active funds to passive ones.  All the growth in mutual funds is in indexes – which don’t follow fundamentals.

Here’s another tidbit: 43% of all US investment assets are now controlled by five firms says the ICI. That’s up 34% since 2000.  The top 25 investment firms control 74% of assets. Uniformity reigns.

Back to healthcare. That sector has been the colossus for years. Our best-performing clients by the metrics we use were in health care. In late August the sector came apart.  Imagine years of accumulation in ETFs and indexes, active investments, and quantitative schemes. Now what will they do?

Run a graph comparing growth in derivatives trading – options, futures and options on futures in multiple asset classes – and overlay US equity trading. The graphs are inversed, with derivatives up 50% since 2009, equity trading down nearly 40%. Translation: What’s growing is derivatives, in step with ETFs. Are you seeing a pattern?

I traded notes with a variety of IR officers yesterday and more than one said the S&P 500 neared a technical inflection point.  They’re reporting what they hear. But who’s following technicals? Not active investors. We should question things more.

Indexes have a statutory responsibility to do what their prospectuses say. They’re not paid to take risk but to manage capital in comportment with a model. They’re not following technicals. ETFs? Unless they’re synthetic, leveraging derivatives, they track indexes, not technicals.

That means the principal followers of technical signals are intermediaries – the money arbitraging price-spreads between indexes, ETFs, individual stocks and sectors. And any asymmetry fostered by news.

Monday Oct 19 the new series of options and futures began trading marketwide. Today VIX measures offering volatility as an asset class expire.  Healthcare between the two collapsed. It’s not fundamental but tied to derivatives. A right to buy at a future price is only valuable if prices rise. Healthcare collapsed at Aug expirations. It folded at Sept expirations. It’s down again with Oct expirations. These investments depended on derivatives rendered worthless.

The point isn’t that so much money is temporary. Plenty buys your fundamentals. But it’s not trading you.  So stop giving traders an advantage by reporting results during options-expirations. You could as well write them a check!

When you play to derivatives timetables, you hurt your holders.  Don’t expect your execs to ask you. They don’t know.  It’s up to you, investor-relations professionals, to help management get it.

Behavioral Volatility

I recall knowing one particularly volatile fellow. I should have called him VIX.

Speaking of the VIX, options on that popularly titled Fear Gauge expire today as a raft of S&P components report results. Many will see sharp moves in share-prices and attempt to put them in rational context.

Volatility derivatives are no sideshow but a mainstream fact. Yesterday the top five  most active ETFs included the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) a Standard & Poor’s Depositary Receipt from State Street that traded 68 million shares, more than any single stock including Apple ahead of results, and the VIX Short-Term Futures ETN iPath (VXX), with 38 million shares, matching Facebook’s volume (out-trading all but seven stocks).

Louis Navellier turned the concept of volatility into quantitative analytics for investment at his Reno advisory firm managing $2.5 billion. Oversimplifying, rising volatility signals change. Mr. Navellier used increasing volatility as a signal to sell highs and buy lows.

By the same token, when your shares break through moving averages, it’s at root a volatility signal. Your price is changing more than the historical central tendency.  But what causes volatility?

This is why we introduced Market Structure Alerts in June for our clients. They’re predicated on the seminal principle that volatility signals change. Rising standard deviation is a pennant pointing to developments you should know. But we want more than surface answers.  Measuring tides alone offers no reasons. So we measure behavioral volatility, not price or volume volatility – which is a byproduct of the former.

When the ocean rolls or roars, we understand that it reflects something else ranging from the gravitational pull of the earth and the moon to earthquakes undersea. We use these facts to shape our understanding of how our ecosystem called earth functions.

A conversation I have often with IR professionals is what I’ll call Story versus Structure.  “My CEO wants to understand why we’re underperforming our peers.”  We have a simple answer and an elementary model that demonstrates it. Yet it can be hard to let go of the notion that underperformance traces to a fundamental feature, the Story. “Our return on equity trails our peer group, so that’s got to be the reason.”

Now sometimes Story is the problem. When it is, it manifests in behavioral change. But don’t forget that the biggest investors are Blackrock and Vanguard. We’re told they’re perpetual holders. No, they’re perpetual trackers of benchmarks like the S&P 500 so they are perpetually in motion, relentlessly sloshing like tides. When these tides crash more violently it’s because money in 401ks and pensions is uniformly beginning to buy or sell, producing disparate impact in stocks.

It’s not Story but Structure. The market functions in a defined way, according to a set of measurable mathematical rules, just like the universe. If we omit some part of market function because it’s complicated it doesn’t cause the behavior to cease to exist. Every IR program today should measure behavioral change.

How many ETFs own your shares?  Our smallest client with market cap of $200 million is in 14. Most are in 30, 40 or more, some over 100. Each of these probably has options and futures and tracks an underlying index, which also has options and futures. All the components of each ETF and underlying index likely have options and futures, just as your shares might. There are exchange-traded notes that directionally leverage indexes and ETFs. Swaps that substitute returns in baskets of these for proceeds in other asset classes. Traders pair futures with stocks and change them each day. And throughout, Blackrock and Vanguard and the rest of their asset-allocation kin behind two million global index products move like massive elephants ever crossing the Serengeti.

Sound dizzying?  It’s your ecosystem. The good news is we’ve reduced its complexities to a set of central tendencies and now we have Alerts that signal when these change.

Why should you care in the IR chair? We’ve got a friend who’s a realtor in Steamboat Springs. She knows everything about it, down to the details of any house you can mention that’s on the market. She knows which neighborhoods get sun in the afternoon, where you should be for easy access to amenities. She knows her market.

We want you to know yours. We hope to help you move from seeing price and volume as a tide moved by mysterious forces to understanding your ecosystem and what distinct behavioral change is behind volatility.

That in turn makes you a powerful expert for your Board and management team. You don’t have to do it, of course. But the quest to be better, to know what there is to know about the market you serve is the difference between something that can become mundane and an enterprise ever fresh and new, an exhilarating exploration.  Some volatility, so to speak, is refreshing!

The Escalator

As the US investor-relations profession’s annual confabulation concludes in the Windy City, we wonder how the week will end.

The problem is risk. Or rather, the cost of transferring it to somebody else. Today the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee Meeting adjourns with Janet Yellen at the microphone offering views on what’s ahead. The Fed routinely misses the economic mark by 50%, meaning our central bank’s legions of number crunchers, colossal budget and balance sheet and twelve regional outposts supporting the globe’s reserve currency offer no more certainty about the future than a coin flip.  That adds risk.

The Fed sets interest rates – not by ordering banks to charge a certain amount for borrowing but through setting the cost at which the Fed itself lends to banks. Higher rates paradoxically present lower risk because money can generate a return by doing nothing.  Idle money now wastes away so it’s getting deployed in ways it wouldn’t otherwise.

If you’re about to heave this edition of the Market Structure Map in the digital dump, thinking, “There goes Quast again, yammering about monetary policy,” you need to know what happens to your stock when this behavior stops. And it will stop.

When the dollar increases in value, it buys more stuff. Things heretofore made larger in price by smaller dollars can reverse course, like earnings and stock-prices.  As the dollar puts downward pressure on share-prices, derivatives like options into which risk has been transferred become valuable. Options are then converted into shares, reversing pressure for a period. This becomes a pattern as investors profit on range-bound equities by trading in and out of derivatives.

Since Sept 2014 when we first warned of the Great Revaluation, the apex of a currency driven thunderhead in things like stocks and bonds, major US equity measures have not moved materially outside a range. Despite periodic bouts of extreme volatility around options-expirations, we’re locked in historic stasis, unmatched in modern times.

The reason is that investors have profited without actually buying or selling real assets. This week all the instruments underpinning leverage and risk-transfer expire, with VIX volatility expirations Wednesday as the Fed speaks. The lack of volatility itself has been an asset class to own like an insurance policy.

Thursday, index futures preferred by Europeans lapse. There’s been colossal volatility in continental stock and bond markets and counterparties will charge more to absorb that risk now, especially with a sharpening Greek crisis that edges nearer default at the end of June. Higher insurance costs put downward pressure on assets like stock-prices.

Then quad-witching arrives Friday when index and stock futures and options lapse along with swap contracts predicated on these derivatives, and the latter is hundreds of trillions of notional-value dollars. On top of all that, there are rebalances for S&P and Nasdaq indices, and the continued gradual rebalancing of the Russell indexes.

Expirations like these revisit us monthly, quad-witching quarterly. That’s not new. But investors have grown wary of trading in and out of derivatives. Falling volumes in equities and options point to rising attention on swaps – the way money transfers risk. We see it in a trend-reversal in the share of volume driven by active investment and risk-management. The latter has been leading the former by market-share for 200 days. Now it’s not. Money is trying to sell but struggling to find an exit.

Here at the Chicago Hyatt Regency on Wacker Drive, when a NIRI General Session ends, the escalators clog with masses of IROs and vendors exiting. Index-investing, a uniform behavior, dominates markets and there is clogged-escalator risk in equities.

It may be nothing.  Money changes directions today with staccato variability. But our job as ever is to watch the data and tell you what we see.  We’ve long been skeptics of the structure wrought by uniform rules, and this is why.  It’s fine so long as the escalator is going up.  When the ride ends, it won’t impact all stocks the same way, however, because leverage through indexes, ETFs and derivatives – the power of the crowd – has not been applied evenly.

This year’s annual lesson then is no new one but a big one nonetheless. Investor-relations professionals must beware more than at any other time of the monumental uniformity-risk in markets now, wrought not by story but macroeconomics and structure.

So, we’re watching the escalator.

Three Days

Some energy-sector clients lost 40% of market-capitalization in three days last October.

A year and a half cultivating share-appreciation and by Wednesday it’s gone.  How so?  To get there let’s take a trip.

I love driving the Llano Estacado, in Spanish “palisaded steppe” or the Staked Plains. From Boise City, OK and unfolding southward to Big Spring, TX lies an expanse fit for nomads, an unending escarpment of mottled browns and khakis flat as iron rail stretching symmetric from the horizon like a sea.

Spanish explorer Francisco Coronado wrote, “I reached some plains so vast that I did not find their limit anywhere I went.” Here Comanches were dominating horse warlords for hundreds of years. Later sprouted first the oil boom early last century around Amarillo and again in the 21st century a neoclassical renaissance punctuated by hydraulic fracturing in the Permian Basin.

The air sometimes is suffused with mercaptan, an additive redolent of rotten egg that signals the otherwise invisible presence of natural gas. But the pressure of a relentless regimen silts away on a foreshortened compass, time seeming to cease and with it the pounding of pulses and devices.  It’s refreshing somehow.

And on a map one can plot with precision a passage from Masterson to Lampasas off The Llano and know what conquering that route demands from clock and fuel gauge.

Energy stocks in August 2014 were humming along at highway speed and then shot off The Llano in October, disappearing into the haze.

(Side note: If you want to discuss this idea, we’re at the NIRI Tristate Chapter in Cincinnati Wed Mar 18 and I’m happy to entertain it!)

What happened?  There are fundamental influences on supply and demand, sure. But something else sets prices. I’ll illustrate with an example. Short interest is often measured in days-to-cover meaning shares borrowed and sold and not yet bought and returned are compared to average daily trading volume. So if you move a million shares daily and your short interest is eight million, days-to-cover is eight, which may be good or bad versus your average.

Twice in recent weeks we’ve seen big blocks in stocks, and short volumes then plunged by half in a day. Both stocks declined. Understand, short interest and short volume differ. The former is shares borrowed but not yet covered. It’s a limited measure of risk.  Carry a big portfolio at a brokerage with marginable accounts and you can appropriate half more against it under rules.

Using a proxy we developed, marketwide in the past five days short volume was about 44%, which at 6.7 billion total shares means borrowed shares were 2.95 billion. Statistically, nearly 30% of all stocks had short volume above 50%.  More shares were rented than owned in those on a given day. (more…)

Market Facts

Volatility derivatives expire today as the Federal Reserve gives monetary guidance. How would you like to be in those shoes? Oh but if you’ve chosen investor-relations as your profession, you’re in them.

Management wants to know why holders are selling when oil – or pick your reason – has no bearing on your shares. Institutional money managers are wary about risking clients’ money in turbulently sliding markets, which condition will subside when institutional investors risk clients’ money. This fulcrum is an inescapable IR fact.

We warned clients Nov 3 that markets had statistically topped and a retreat likely would follow between one and 30 days out. Stocks closed yesterday well off early-Nov levels and the S&P 500 is down 100 points from post-Thanksgiving all-time highs.

The point isn’t being right but how money behaves today. Take oil. The energy boom in the USA has fostered jobs and opportunity, contributing to some capacity in the American economy to separate from sluggish counterparts in Asia and Europe. Yet with oil prices imploding on a sharply higher dollar (bucks price oil, not vice versa), a boon for consumers at the pump becomes a bust for capital investment, and the latter is a key driver in parts of the US that have led job-creation.

Back to the Fed, the US central bank by both its own admission and data compiled at the Mortgage Bankers Association (see this MBA white paper if you’re interested) has consumed most new mortgages coming on the market in recent years, buying them from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and primary dealers.

Why? Consumption drives US Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and vital to recovery in still-anemic discretionary spending is stronger home prices, which boost personal balance sheets, instilling confidence and fueling borrowing and spending.

Imagine the consternation behind the big stone walls on Maiden Lane in New York. The Fed has now stopped minting money to buy mortgages (it’ll churn some of the $1.7 trillion of mortgage-backed securities it owns, and hold some). With global asset markets of all kinds in turmoil, especially stocks and commodities, other investors may be reluctant successors to Fed demand. Should mortgages and home-values falter in step with stocks, mortgage rates could spike.

What a conundrum. If the Fed fails to offer 2015 guidance on interest rates and mortgage costs jump, markets will conclude the Fed has lost control. Yet if a fearful Fed meets snowballing pressure on equities and commodities by prolonging low rates, real estate could stall, collapsing the very market supporting better discretionary spending.

Now look around the globe at crashing equity prices, soaring bonds, imploding commodities, vast currency volatility (all of it reminiscent of latter 2008), and guess what?  Derivatives expire Dec 17-19, concluding with quad-witching. Derivatives notional-value in the hundreds of trillions outstrips all else, and nervous counterparties and their twitchy investors will be hoping to find footing.

If you’ve ever seen the movie Princess Bride (not our first Market Structure Map nod to it), what you’re reading seems like a game of wits with a Sicilian – which is on par with the futility of a land war in Asia. Yet, all these things matter to you there in the IR chair, because you must know your audience.  It’s comprised of investors with responsibility to safeguard clients’ assets. (more…)

Perspective

It’s not what you think.  Heard that phrase before?

Last Wednesday, Oct 15, apparently everybody trading equities believed the world was dissolving in an apocalyptic stew of Ebola, European recession, unused petroleum, Chinese debt and Mideast terror. The DJIA at one point dropped 460 points.

Son of a gun. By Friday, October 17 we were back to milk and honey and Captain Crunch! The DJIA rose 263 points. Human nature is fickle. But this juxtaposition stretches credulity. It’s also a lesson on market structure.

In 2013, according to the Investment Company Institute, net US inflows to mutual funds were $152 billion, of which $52 billion went to target-date hybrid funds (mixes of bonds and equities based on one’s age), and about $53 billion to index funds, 82% of which track major market measures like the S&P 500. Exchange-traded funds garnered another $180 billion, mostly equity instruments that track funds tied to indices.

If two-thirds of the net new cash followed asset-allocation vehicles and a greater sum still sought ETFs, which post daily market positions, the likelihood that most of your price-movement reflects fundamentals is low unless you have an activist (event-driven money can catalyze bipolarity in market behavior – higher highs and lower lows).

There’s an animation sequence I’ve seen that starts with what appears to be mountains or desert from great height. Then our vantage point pans back and we see with surprise that it’s something else entirely: the brown pupil of a person’s eye.  We sweep back and the person is standing on a shoreline. Then back we scan across forests, mountains, rivers, countries and then continents until we’re in space seeing below us a lovely cobalt sphere, and we pan further, and it’s the blue pupil of a giant being. (more…)

Risk

We figured if The President goes there it must be nice.

Reality often dashes great expectations but not so with Martha’s Vineyard where we marked our wedding anniversary. From Aquinnah’s white cliffs to windy Katama Beach, through Oak Bluffs (on bikes) to the shingled elegance of Edgartown, the island off Cape Cod is a winsome retreat.

Speaking of retreat, my dad, a Korean Police Action era (the US Congress last declared war in 1943, on Romania. Seriously.) veteran, told me his military commanders never used the word retreat, choosing instead “advance to the rear!”

Is the stock market poised for an advance to the rear? Gains yesterday notwithstanding, our measures of market sentiment reflected in the ten-point ModernIR Behavioral Index dipped to negative this week for the first time since mid-August. Risk is a chrysalis formed in shadows, studied by some with interest but generally underappreciated.

It happened in 2006 in housing, when trader John Paulson recognized it and put on his famous and very big short. Most missed the chrysalis hanging rather elegantly in the mushrooming rafters of the hot residential sector.

It happened in the 17th century Dutch tulip bubble, an archetype for manic markets.  Yet then tulips and buyers didn’t suddenly explode but just the money behind both, as ships from the New World laden with silver and gold flooded Flanders mints with material for coin. Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon.

It’s hard to say if mania is here hanging pupa-esque on the cornices of the capital markets. Most say no though wariness abounds. Mergers are brisk and venture capital has again propagated a Silicon Valley awash in money-losing firms with eye-popping values. Corporate buybacks will surpass $1 trillion in total for 2013-2014, capital raking out shares from markets like leaves falling from turning September trees. (more…)

The Risk

On a hot Sunday 138 years ago today, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer rode into the valley Native Americans called the Greasy Grass. The rest is history.

Speaking of unexpected defeat, wonder what ambush caused yesterday’s sharp market reversal? Here’s a ModernIR Rule: The day after a new marketwide series of options and futures begins trading is a leading indicator of institutional asset-allocation plans.

Options and futures expired June 18-20. The new series took effect June 23. Yesterday was Rule Day.  Counterparties including major broker-dealers hold inventory through expirations and these resets. If stocks then decline, they had too much inventory for demand-levels.

Now, one can blame bearish Dubai stocks or sudden weakness in the UK Sterling or something else. But this rule is consistently true: If there’s more money in equities, stocks rise because counterparties undershot estimates. The reverse? Counterparties dump inventory and stocks drop.

Is this dip the tip of the long-anticipated bear turn?  Right now, total sentiment by our measures doesn’t show that risk. But. Sentiment has consistently faded before offering investors a market-top for profit-taking, in itself a bearish signal.

Speaking of risk, Cliff Asness’s high-speed trading piece at Bloomberg is humorous and compelling. I admire the AQR founder for his smarts, success and libertarian leanings.

But I disagree on HFT.  Mr. Asness defends it, saying: “The current competitive market-based solution is delivering the product, meaning liquidity for investors, better and cheaper than ever. Moving away from this competitive landscape would be an invitation for incompetent central planning or rapacious monopolistic practices.” (more…)

Fires, Crashes and Kill Switches

Suppose the engine of your vehicle was on fire.

The logical response would be to shut it off. But what if you were traveling at highway speed and killing the fuel supply meant you had no power breaks or steering? What if your vehicle was a jet fighter?

There are ramifications.

Last Thursday and Friday stocks plunged. Monday and Tuesday this week, shares soared. I doubt most of us think that people were selling in a stampede last week and then woke up Monday and went, “Shazzam! What have we done? We should be buying!”

Context matters.

This week offers an event in similar rarified air as blood moons in the northern hemisphere. Good Friday closes markets to end the week. Between are the usual three sets of expirations: volatility derivatives, index futures, and the remaining host of options and futures set for monthly expiry (with earnings now too – another reminder for you learned IROs to avoid that mash-up if at all possible). (more…)