Tagged: Options Expirations

IR Pros Must Know Macro Factors

We were sitting on the porch in the shadow of the American flag Sunday September 11 when fighter jets streaked and thundered so low that all of Denver shook. We caught glimpses of pairs of F-15s and F-16s, afterburners hot. Later, we read that warplanes from Denver escorted two flights with suspicious passengers aboard. But the ten-year memorial passed in peace.

Speaking of thunderous roar, I attended the jam-packed NIRI Rocky Mountain Chapter’s kickoff session today. Nasdaq chief economist Frank Hatheway offered a thoughtful and statistical look at the market. He joked that when he first prepared slides two weeks ago, the trends were improving but he’d had to change his comments to reflect reality.

Dr. Hatheway launched his talk by comparing stock indices with VIX volatility, Treasury yields, oil prices and gold. He observed that investor-relations professionals today need to develop a level of understanding of these “macro factors” – benchmarks of group behavior across asset classes (clients, we include a Macro Factors segment on page two of your Market Structure Report). (more…)

Yin and Yang in Your Stock

Stocks go up and down. Nothing new there.

The dollar dropped for a second straight day today. Stocks are again up, like they were yesterday. The dollar gained ground last Wed-Fri, and stocks fell.

This week marks the end of the month and quarter. We recommend in our IR Calendar that you consider some tactical timing as part of your overall IR strategy. Generally, the last few trading days of a quarter or month aren’t best for releasing good news. But they may be perfect for bad news.

Why? Institutions will be shoring up portfolio returns or managing exposure to market risk. They address risk by offsetting it with something that is inversely correlated. Notice that stocks and the dollar are inversely correlated. Notice that the dollar and other currencies, such as the Euro, are often inversely correlated. (more…)

Take the Pulse of Your Stock

Coming to NIRI National 2011 next week? Please visit us at Booth 304! We have no helicopter rides or trips to the Bahamas to give, but we do have a really cool microfiber for keeping those ubiquitous touchscreen pads and smartphones sharp.

June launched by kicking markets right in the rump. We blamed economic data. It’s true but not that simple. Behind the data at the behavioral level, institutions decided against equities roughly May 13. We don’t make this up, we just observe it in the way trades execute. When methodologies, purposes or time horizons change, it manifests in trade executions.

Money didn’t hedge with options expirations May 18-20 either. If you decide not to insure your house against loss, what might that mean? That you expect to sell it shortly, that risk is nonexistent, or that insurance is too darned expensive. As an analogy, two of those three are negatives and the middle one doesn’t exist on Wall Street.

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Karen and I are getting in boat shape ahead of a trip to Antigua (Motto: “Don’t ever say the name ‘Allen Stanford’ around here”). But we’ve encountered obstacles to the cycling part of the regimen: Wind and fire. One more, such as earth, and we’ve have a good name for a rock band. It’s been bone-dry and breezy on the Front Range, and already several range fires have burned black swaths.

Speaking of fires, we’re marching through them with the Issuer Data Initiative. The Number One Need is more names behind it. If you haven’t committed support for better trading data, do so today. Your peers will thank you someday, and you can remind them then that they owe you.

Before we get to what happened Mar 16-21 in trading markets, a word on BATS Exchange. The Kansas City operator of the third-largest American trading venue has made no secret of its interest in listing companies for public trading. BATS made it official today, announcing plans to offer IPOs another path to global liquidity.

Provided BATS offers competitive listing prices and good data, it can compete. We hope exchange executives will consider the key data points in the Issuer Data Initiative. BATS has a reputation for data excellence already, providing a great deal of free data to its trading clients.

We see too that BATS filed a proposed rule change with the SEC last month that will require customers to mark trades as principal (for their own accounts), agency (on behalf of others) or riskless principal (buying from or selling to a customer). See, issuers? Exchanges file rules to change how things are done. Issuers are participants in markets too. If they want something changed, they too can ask.

What drove trading markets roughly March 16-21 also speaks to the importance of good data. Somebody always must execute the trade and report it. That’s the way we all know the volume for any stock. On March 16, the G-7 countries announced a concerted effort to devalue the Japanese yen by flooding markets with currency. March 16-18 also included the monthly options-expirations cycle, and S&P quarterly index rebalances.

During the same period, we observed uniformity in trading activity for a set of “primary dealers” that work with central banks in the United States, Europe and Japan. Across the market-cap and sector spectrum, the same behavior occurred for this set of primary dealers.

We surmise that central banks armed these large brokerages with cash, which is how central banks engage in “quantitative easing.” The brokerages, also all commercial banks today, deployed it by buying securities from selling institutions. It had the desired effect, stabilizing equity markets and reducing upward pressure on the yen.

We’ve seen that many stocks have returned to their pre-March-10 “rational price” levels. But the behaviors producing those prices aren’t rational. If these were riskless principal transactions, do governments now own a bunch of equities with taxpayer dollars? Or were these all principal trades and so the brokers now have high levels of inventory?

Let’s suppose it’s the latter. Fine, so long as markets rise. Brokers can sell inventory as more buyers return to equities. It’s bad, however, if, say, Portugal defaults, causing the Euro to weaken and the dollar to rise. US equities would slide, and brokers would dump inventory to protect themselves as markets fell.

So everybody get out there and buy something made in Portugal.

Missing the Mark in Algorithmic Trading

Do you think your stock trades well?

While you ponder, a confession: We’re guilty of a bait and switch. If I’d written “implementation shortfall,” which is what I mean, rather than “missing the mark” above, which is what I said, I might be responsible for a chain-reaction narcoleptic catastrophe, people randomly falling asleep mid-word and banging heads on laptops, iPads, desks, afternoon pub beverages. (more…)

Trading Goes Beyond the Edge

We were in Lake Jackson, TX, last week for Karen’s HS reunion. South Texas is a sweat lodge this time of year, but the Saint Augustine grass lies lush and luminescent under the sycamores and live oaks. And we saw not one tar ball on Surfside Beach in Freeport.

A word on trading: We expected money to move after options expirations, but changes to program-trading plans came early, on July 14, we observed in the data. So with expirations July 15-16, markets were shellacked when money shifted to other assets. The past two days have given us massive arbitrage around this shift and ahead of tomorrow’s volatility expirations. Thus, the week could end on a rough note, we fear. (more…)

Quant Trading at the Hudson

Spring finally tossed its verdant cape over the Denver Front Range. We saw it firsthand on our bikes from Sedalia to Palmer Lake last weekend, our first 40-plus miler of the year. It’s been too cold! We know you Californians among us are already past the early and midseason allergens.

Meanwhile in Manhattan, down on Old Slip between Water and South streets there hums and whizzes a sharp shop of folks whose cares are far removed from the seasons. And apparently geography too, for Hudson River Trading sits just off the East River. (more…)

Risk and Naked Access

Hope you enjoyed MLK Weekend! We were on bikes for the first time in Twenty Ten as temperatures tickled the high 50s Saturday and Sunday on Colorado’s Front Range.

TRAVEL UPDATE: I’m in Kansas City today joining Joe Ratterman, CEO of BATS, and Jeff Albright, head of equity trading at Waddell & Reed, for a NIRI panel on how stocks trade. Thursday Jan 21, I’ll be at the NYC NIRI meeting with Professor Bob Schwartz of Baruch College, Jim Ross from NYSE Euronext, and Donald Bollerman of Nasdaq OMX to “demystify the markets.” See Events & Articles at modernir.com for more, and join us. (more…)