Tagged: public companies

The Committee

I’ve learned lots about politics the last couple weeks.

In June 2014, SEC Chair Mary Jo White said:  “We must evaluate all issues through the prism of the best interest of investors and the facilitation of capital formation for public companies. The secondary markets exist for investors and public companies, and their interests must be paramount.”

You remember that?  We wrote here about it, thinking perhaps for once a regulator wasn’t gazing over the heads of all the public companies in the room.

Last autumn, SEC Commissioner Kara Stein’s office asked me to join Chair White’s proposed Market Structure Advisory Committee, a group meant to help the SEC formulate inclusive policies. Energized by SEC rhetoric, I said I’d do it.

As time passed, we had wind through relationships in the capital markets of intense lobbying around the committee. We decided we’d do something contrary to my nature:  Keep our mouths shut.

On January 13 this year, the SEC revealed the members and I was not among them. I felt some relief, supposing CEOs of public companies with names weightier than ours had been added instead.

Then I read the list. The first person named was the co-CEO of a quantitative proprietary high-frequency-trading outfit. The head of Exchange-Traded Funds (ETF) for a broker was there, as was a former NYSE executive now at Barclays, the firm sued by the New York attorney general over trading practices. Four professors made the cut, one an ex-Senator.  People from Convergex, Citadel, Bloomberg Tradebook – all dark pools, or alternative-trading systems run by brokers. Heck, the corporate secretary for AARP somehow got on a market-structure committee. Really. (more…)

Reg Nemesis

Omaha!

Rather than Nebraska, we’re in Steamboat Springs enjoying spectacular slopes before this weekend’s big game between our Broncos and the Seahawks.

Denver quarterback Peyton Manning uses the word “Omaha” to change plays or alert his team to shifting defensive coverage. In football, both defenses and offenses try to confuse the opposition with different formations. It’s deception.

In the stock market, the principal purpose of algorithms is to deceive and algorithms execute 90% of stock orders now. The stock market isn’t supposed to contain “the opposition” but buyers and sellers who want to find each other. Why are they hiding instead?

Part of the problem is Regulation National Market System. If you didn’t see Wall Street Journal writer Jacob Bunge’s piece (if you can’t open the link, email me and I’ll send the story) on what’s popularly called “Reg NMS” yesterday, it’s required reading for every IRO, CEO and CFO at public companies.

Two vignettes from Mr. Bunge’s story: (more…)

Pay Attention to Your Trading

We’re leaving most of this week’s email to our friend Joe Saluzzi at Themis Trading. Joe is a groundbreaking and thoughtful critic of contemporary trading, and among the smartest people we know. Last October, Steve Kroft interviewed Joe on 60 Minutes about our machine-driven markets.

Read what Joe says below about the recent Nasdaq website security issue. Even if you trade elsewhere. You all trade everywhere today. Do you know how much of your volume trades on your listing exchange?

How about your volume at other venues? The brokers executing these trades? The smallest investor trading just 100 shares can know whether a trade is executed on an agency or principal basis. But public companies don’t even know the brokers behind the majority of trades.

How about your daily short volume? Exchanges are currently implementing circuit breakers on short trades as required under SEC amendments to Reg SHO. But public companies don’t even know what part of their daily volume is short. (more…)