Tagged: Reg NMS

The Math

“Making investment decisions by looking solely at the fundamentals of individual companies is no longer a viable investment philosophy.”

So said Steve Eisman, made famous in Michael Lewis’s book The Big Short, upon shutting down his new investment fund in 2014.  Actor Steve Carrell portrayed Eisman as Mark Baum in last year’s hit movie from the book.

Michael Burry, the quirky medical doctor running Scion Capital in the book and the movie (played by Christian Bale), first earned street credibility via posts about stocks on Silicon Investor, the online discussion forum huge before the dot-com bubble burst.

But in the ten years after Regulation National Market System transformed the stock market in 2005 from a vibrant human enterprise into a wide-area data network, 98% of all active stock-pickers failed to beat the S&P 500, proving Mr. Eisman correct.  You can’t pick stocks on merits alone now.

That’s contrary to the legacy objective of the investor-relations profession, which is to stand the company’s story apart from the rest.

As with finding the root of the mortgage-industry rot, today the market is all about data.  Everything is.  Google Analytics examines internet traffic patterns.  ZipRecruiter is analytics for hiring. Betterment is analytics for personal investing.  HomeAdvisor and Angie’s List are analytics for home-repair. Pandora is analytics for music you like.

Pick your poison. Everything is data. So why, ten years after Reg NMS, is the IR profession calling someone to ask, “How come my stock is down today?” All trades pricing the market under Reg NMS must by law be automated.

If you’re calling somebody to ask about your stock, I’m sorry but you’re doing IR like a caveman. And, paraphrasing Steve Eisman, running the IR department solely by telling the story to investors is no longer a viable industry philosophy.

Why? Because it begins with the flawed premise that the money buying and selling your shares is motivated by fundamentals alone.  For the past decade – the span of Reg NMS – trillions have departed active stock-picking portfolios and shifted to indexes and Exchange-Traded Funds, because tracking a benchmark is a better path to returns.

Take yesterday.  All you had to do was buy technology and materials stocks.  Today it might be something else. The most widely traded stock on the planet is SPY, the S&P 500 ETF.  It traded $7 billion of volume yesterday, ten times BAC, the most active stock.

Here’s another. XLU, the Utilities ETF, was among the 25 most actively traded issues yet the sector barely budged, up 0.04%. Why active then? ETFs fuel arbitrage.  Profiting on price-differences. It’s not where prices close but how they change intraday.

Best trade yesterday?  NUGT, the leveraged gold ETF, was up 7.5% even though gold has been a bust the past month.  The S&P 500 took the whole year to gain 10% and then only on the Trump Bump. Between Dec 30 and Oct 31, the S&P 500 eked out 2% appreciation. You could triple that in a day with NUGT so why invest long-term?

“Boy, Quast,” you say. “It’s the holiday season! What are you, The Grinch?”

Not at all! The opposite in fact. I’m on a quest to make IR central to public companies again. We invented Market Structure Analytics, data for the IR profession to address the demise of IR as Storyteller.  The future for our profession isn’t a command of fundamentals but knowledge of market form and function.

Let me be blunt. Anybody can tell the story. Only IR professionals dedicate themselves to knowing how the market works – and that’s job security, a transferrable skill set.

The way IR shifts back from a rotational role to vital standalone profession is through knowledge of the stock market. If you want to be a biologist, study and understand biology. If you want to be a biology reporter, you just need to know some biologists (no offense to biology reporters).

Which will the IR profession be in 2017?

Having threshed trading data for 15 years now through the regulatory and behavioral transformation of the equity market, I feel a tad like those guys in The Big Short who studied mortgage numbers and concluded it was irrefutable: It was going to blow up.

These data are irrefutable: Over 80% of your volume most days is driven by something much shorter-term than your business strategy.  Ergo, if all you tell your Board and management is how your strategy influences the stock, you’ll at some point be in trouble.

This is the lesson of 2016.  Make 2017 the year IR transforms how the people in the boardrooms of America understand the stock market. That is an invigorating challenge that will breathe value into our profession. The math doesn’t lie.

Two Faces

In Roman mythology, Janus is the two-faced god of beginnings and endings.  In Denver, Janus is the god of investing. In the news, Janus is merging with UK money manager Henderson.

The move reflects the two faces of the stock market, beginnings and endings and gates and doorways, like the figure from Rome’s old religion.  Today’s market is the inverse of the one prevailing when Tom Bailey launched Janus from a one-room Denver office in 1969, choosing the front-range town over New York to avoid Wall Street GroupThink.

For the next three decades, Janus boomed through a culture of camaraderie built around proprietary financial modeling to find the most dynamic, well-run companies. Janus was a stock-picker of the highest caliber with a penchant for bucking the crowd and going long, big.  Star fund manager Tom Marsico epitomized the Janus style with his Focus Fund backing typically 20 stocks.

Janus embraced the New Economy and chased technology. Though Marsico left in 1997 in a dispute with management, Janus, which was then owned by Kansas City Southern before spinning out publicly as part of Stilwell Financial, became the best mutual-fund company in the business, peaking at $330 billion of assets in 1999.

Then the Internet Bubble burst. In latter 2000 as tech stocks cratered, Janus was losing $1 billion a day in asset-value. In 2001, the firm cut half its staff and saw assets under management dip below $200 billion. The name Stilwell, a moniker fashioned to honor rail tycoon Arthur Stilwell, went away and the two-faced god returned as a public firm.

But the US stock market emerged from the 20th century fundamentally altered, a National Market System. Well, there is no “market system.” It’s one or the other. A market is organic commercial interaction – a dynamic environment where shrewd analysis and the search for the best is a recipe for the success that bred Janus. A system is a process and method. Success in a system turns on stripping out cost and following a model.

The National Market System today is a process and method. GroupThink. Exactly what Janus eschewed. Blackrock and Vanguard have roared past yesterday’s stock-picking heroes like Janus by stripping cost out and tracking averages, thriving at GroupThink.

It’s remarkable testament to the state of the market that being average is the key to being best. And how did we get a market where average is king? Process and method. Rules.

The Order Handling Rules in 1997 decreed that stock markets must display prices set by Electronic Communications Networks, which obliterated a fixture of exchanges back to the 1792 Buttonwood Agreement that brokers not undercut each other on price.  Regulation ATS required all trades to occur through brokers or exchanges, putting the brokers who created exchanges into competition with their progeny. Decimalization in 2001 wiped out the market-making spread necessary for investment banks to fund small-cap stock research (small-cap IPOs plunged by 90%).

Then Regulation National Market System, a product of Congressional legislation, crafted a single marketplace functioning like a data network around the best national bid or offer. A network of linked nodes isn’t competition. It’s a system. The process and method for navigating the network determines success. Machines navigate it best, so the biggest source of volume today is Fast Trading, which writes no research, carries no inventory, underwrites nothing.

In the decade ended Dec 31, 2015 spanning the creation of the National Market System, 98% of all stock-pickers have failed to beat the average – the S&P 500.  The reason isn’t prowess from passives but how indexes and ETFs strip out cost and construct portfolios around the average prices that now securities regulators require (“Best Execution”).

If you’re looking for outliers like Janus, this market is the wrong one for you (and if you seek that money as the investor-relations profession does, it’s stacked against you too). So money is rushing with great sound and fury from them and into indexes and ETFs.

Mergers are driven by effort to strip out cost.  Henderson is paying $2 billion for Janus to form a manager with $300 billion of assets – smaller than Janus in 1999. Ironically, the amount Henderson is paying equals the investment outflows from the two in 2016.  Janus CEO Dick Weil will co-head the company with Henderson CEO Andrew Formica and will move from Denver to London.

Regulators: Is there not one of you paying attention? You did this. You are wrecking the market for stock-picking, for small-caps, for American capitalism. Now you’ve driven Janus out of Denver.  We don’t need a two-faced market where just one smiles.  Keep this up and you’ll foster the mother of all backlashes.

25 Basis Points

Whether public companies are winning in the stock market comes down to basis points.

The Buttonwood Agreement formulating the US public equity market in 1792 affirmed in two terse sentences that its parties would charge a quarter-point commission.

Last weekend Jason Zweig wrote about “May Day” for the Wall Street Journal. On May 1, 1975, under pressure from the SEC and Justice Department antitrust lawyers, and seeing a path to reducing market-fragmentation and competition from low-cost platforms like Instinet, the NYSE ended fixed commissions. Many brokers saw doomsday looming and called it “Mayday.”

As Mr. Zweig says, assertions of industry demise proved both exaggerated and misplaced. Volumes boomed, advertising about stock-trading exploded, Charles Schwab created the greatest Everyman brokerage in the history of the profession and here in 2015 the notion that set costs for trading was ever a good one are scorned.

It was called “deregulation” since the rule inked by quill pen May 17, 1792 stating “We the Subscribers, Brokers for the Purchase and Sale of the Public Stock, do hereby solemnly promise and pledge ourselves to each other, that we will not buy or sell from this day for any person whatsoever, any kind of Public Stock, at a less rate than one quarter percent Commission on the Specie value of and that we will give preference to each other in our Negotiations” was rescinded.

Under deregulation has come tens of thousands of pages of rules ranging from exchange order-types that hide shares even though exchanges are markets where shares are displayed, to the structural opus magnum Regulation National Market System decreeing trading at the best national price and dividing consequent data revenue.

When you dine out, what’s a fair tip?  If somebody handles bags for you at the hotel, what do you give them?  In 1792, brokers thought 25 basis points an acceptable fee for finding a buyer for a seller, and vice versa. (more…)

Take and Make

What if exchanges stopped paying fast traders to set prices? Oh, you didn’t know? Read on.

Off Salt Island in the British Virgins is the wreck of the HMS Rhone, a steamer that sank in an 1867 hurricane.  Even if you’re a snorkeler like me rather than a diver, in the clear BVI water you can see the ribs, the giant drive shaft, the shadowy hulk of a first-rate vessel for its day, 70 feet below the surface.  A storm surprised the Rhone, and after losing an anchor in the channel trying to ride out the squall, the captain ran for open water, unwittingly slamming into the teeth of the tempest.

What’s a 19th century Caribbean wreck got to do with high-frequency trading?  What seems the right thing to do can bring on what you’re trying to avoid by doing it in the first place.

On July 15, Senator Carl Levin called on the Securities and Exchange Commission to end the “maker-taker” fee structure under which exchanges pay traders to sell shares.  I’ve long opposed maker-taker, high-frequency trading and Regulation National Market System.

We have Reg NMS thanks to Congress.  In 1975, that body set in motion today’s HFT flap by inserting Section 11A, the National Market System amendments, into the Securities Act of 1934, and instead of a “free market system,” we had a “national market system.” What a difference one word made.

The legislation mandated a unified electronic tape for stock prices. The NYSE claimed the law took its private property – the data – without due process.  Regulators responded with concessions on how exchanges would set prices for trading. The result: The Consolidated Tape Association (CTA).

Today, the CTA is comprised of the registered US stock exchanges.  Its rules governing quoting and trading determine how exchanges divide roughly $500 million in revenue generated through data that powers stock tickers from Yahoo! Finance to  E*Trade.  If an exchange quotes stocks at the best national bid or offer 50% of the time, and matches 25% of the trades, it gets the lion’s share of data revenue for those stocks. And the more price-setting activity at an exchange, the more valuable their proprietary data products and technology services become. Data has value if it helps traders make pricing decisions.

Here’s where history meets HFT. Reg NMS requires trades to meet at the best price. Exchanges have no shares because they’re not owned by brokers with books of business as in the past. They pay traders to bring shares and trades that create the best prices.  In 2013, NASDAQ OMX paid $1 billion in rebates to generate $385 million of net income.  Subtract revenue from information services and technology solutions ($890 million in 2013, built on pricing data) and NASDAQ OMX loses money.  Prices matter.  NYSE owner Intercontinental Exchange (ICE) opposes maker-taker presumably because it made $550 million in profit without the NYSE in 2012, and half that adding the NYSE in 2013. For a derivatives firm, equities are a tail to wag the dog. (more…)

Setting Prices

Do you remember that movie, The Island?  The people who every day hope they’re selected to go to a tropical paradise are unwitting machinery for others.

I won’t give it away in case you’ve not seen Scarlett Johansson and Ewan McGregor tearing through the sky on some futuristic motorcycle. Things are not what they at first seem. That’s the point.

Which leads us to Nasdaq OMX PSX.  On August 1, the PSX becomes what it calls “a Price Setter Pro Rata algorithm for all symbols, pending SEC approval.” The PSX once was the Pacific Stock Exchange. Now it’s one of the Nasdaq’s three stock markets.

If it’s an exchange, why do they call it an algorithm? Because it’s less a marketplace than a mathematical calculation designed to do something: Set prices. It guarantees traders 40% of an order so long as size meets requisites.

In its marketing materials, the Nasdaq says the PSX is “a Reg NMS protected quote and runs on proven INET technology.” A quote? A price. Under Reg NMS, protected quotes must be automated and cannot be ignored by the market. So the PSX is a price.

INET was a trading system created by the dark-pool Instinet that merged in 2002 with Island, another electronic communications network, or “ECN.” ECNs slaughtered exchanges in the 90s, taking perhaps 65% of all trading at the peak before exchanges bought them and in effect became ECNs. Nasdaq acquired INET in 2005.

Now stay with me here. This story relates directly to you, in the IR chair. There’s a trading firm called Chimera Securities. We see it in about 75% of our Nasdaq client base. It’s a proprietary trader – no customer accounts. It trades equities and options. It provides a platform for hundreds of professional day-traders to execute diverse speculative tactics, and it runs automated strategies to utilize liquidity its traders hold. It’s a member of the Nasdaq OMX PSX, and the Nasdaq OMX PHLX, the latter the Nasdaq’s options platform. Chimera belongs only to these two markets. (more…)

Flash Boys

I don’t skateboard. But the title of Michael Lewis’s new book on high-speed trading, Flash Boys, made me think Lewis could’ve called it DC-town & Flash Boys.

Legendary skateboarder Stacy Peralta directed the 2001 documentary Dogtown & Z-boys chronicling the meteoric rise of a craze involving slapping wheels on little boards and engaging in aerobatic feats using public infrastructure such as steps and handrails. From Dogtown, slang for south Santa Monica near Venice Beach, Peralta’s Sean-Penn-narrated film tracked the groundbreaking (and wrist-breaking) 1978 exploits of the Zephyr skateboarding team, thus the “Z-boys.”

Skateboarding has got nothing to do with trading, save that both are frantic activities with dubious social benefit. We’ve been declaiming on these pages for more than a half-decade how fast intermediaries are stock-market cholesterol. So, more attention is great if the examiner’s light shines in the right place.

If you missed it, literary gadfly Lewis, whose works as the Oscar Wilde of nonfictional exposé include Moneyball (loved the movie), Blindside, Liar’s Poker and the Big Short, last week told 60 Minutes the US stock market is rigged.

The high-frequency trading crowd was caught flat-footed. But yesterday Brad Katsuyama from IEX, a dark pool for long investors that rose out of RBC, dusted it up on CNBC with Bill O’Brien from BATS/Direct Edge, an exchange catering to fast orders.

Which brings us to why Lewis might’ve called his book DC-town & Flash Boys. The exploitation of speedy small orders goes back to 1988. In the wake of the 1987 crash, volumes dropped because people feared markets. The NASD (FINRA today) created the Small Order Execution System (SOES – pronounced “soze”) both to give small investors a chance to trade 100 shares electronically, and to stimulate volume. Banditry blossomed. Professionals with computers began trading in wee increments. Volume returned. The little guy? Hm.

Regulators have always wanted to give the little guy opportunity to execute orders like the big guys. It’s admirable. It’s also impossible. Purchasing power is king. Attempt to make $1 and $1,000 equal in how trades execute, and what will happen is the big guys will shift to doing things $1 at a time. The little guy will still lose out but now your market is mayhem confusing busy with productive.

These benighted gaffes seem eerily to originate in Washington DC. Michael Lewis says big banks, high-speed traders and exchanges have rigged markets. We agree these three set prices for everybody. But they’re following the rules. (more…)

Unwired

It’s got to stop. Warren Buffett said so.

Until the Wall Street Journal’s Scott Patterson broke the story recently, most investor-relations professionals were unaware that Berkshire Hathaway unit Business Wire took fees from high-speed firms in trade for early delivery of news. It provoked outrage in circles including the office of the New York state attorney general.

I was quoted by Bloomberg’s Sam Mamudi in a related piece last Friday. What I thought was most important didn’t make the story. Sure, if something looks bad you should stop doing it, and I said so. In today’s parlance, the optics were bad.

“Quast,” you say. “They were selling our news to high-speed traders before it hit distribution channels.”

Half of every plane load today is in Group One because people get status for giving business to just one airline. It’s an early look.

“That’s flying. You don’t get in trouble for boarding early. You get locked in the poke for trading on things nobody else has got.”

That’s not true. Valuable information is the bedrock of capital-formation. Otherwise, the market would be one big index fund. And what Business Wire did wasn’t illegal.

“Are you defending it?” you say.

No. It’s bad form in an era where form, like optics, is more important than substance. But it’s like a police officer pulling somebody over for a bad taillight – which is not illegal but a safety hazard – and ignoring that the car is stolen. (more…)

Reg Nemesis

Omaha!

Rather than Nebraska, we’re in Steamboat Springs enjoying spectacular slopes before this weekend’s big game between our Broncos and the Seahawks.

Denver quarterback Peyton Manning uses the word “Omaha” to change plays or alert his team to shifting defensive coverage. In football, both defenses and offenses try to confuse the opposition with different formations. It’s deception.

In the stock market, the principal purpose of algorithms is to deceive and algorithms execute 90% of stock orders now. The stock market isn’t supposed to contain “the opposition” but buyers and sellers who want to find each other. Why are they hiding instead?

Part of the problem is Regulation National Market System. If you didn’t see Wall Street Journal writer Jacob Bunge’s piece (if you can’t open the link, email me and I’ll send the story) on what’s popularly called “Reg NMS” yesterday, it’s required reading for every IRO, CEO and CFO at public companies.

Two vignettes from Mr. Bunge’s story: (more…)

Follow the Money

If you appeal a parking ticket to the Parking Department, what’s your expectation of objectivity? The Parking Department collects revenues.

Which brings us to word circulating last week from CEO Duncan Niederauer that NYSE Euronext and other exchanges are confronting the growing problem of off-exchange trading. “It impacts the quality and integrity of the U.S. capital market – and ultimately the ability of markets to enable companies like yours to raise capital efficiently,” Niederaur wrote in a letter to issuers (which a variety of alert readers passed along to me).

Shouldn’t we first ask why money has fled displayed markets? Private equity is working great. It’s a non-displayed market. Pensions and endowments have nearly twice as much money in private equity than public equity today. Investors aren’t forced to transact off the exchanges. They choose to.

Now exchanges want regulators to herd them back to displayed markets…for your good? Or for theirs? There’s a biblical proverb that says, “The first to present his case seems right, until another comes forward to question him.”

I think fragmented markets are a problem. But the reason the NYSE and other exchanges want trading between brokers to move back to exchanges isn’t for capital-formation purposes. It’s because the NYSE and other exchanges are data and technology vendors. NYSE Technologies last year generated $473 million of revenue supplying data, circuits and technologies to those trading your shares. (more…)

Moving Averages

What if we forecasted the weather on temperature moving-averages?

It would seem silly. After all, ENIAC ran the first mathematical computations for a weather model in 1950. ENIAC is not an Icelandic singer. It’s the first true computer and was built by University of Pennsylvania professors in 1946 with funding from the United States Army.

Now, TV weather departments use models that consume data about jet streams, moisture, temperature fluctuations, topography and other factors to project outcomes. For instance, those models say it’ll snow in Denver tonight after 80-degree temperatures the past three days. Chances are they’re right. It’s a significant predictive advance over the old method, the Native American Rock model, in which a rock was hung on a string outdoors. If the rock was wet, it was raining. And so on.

Humans use mathematical models in many predictive ways today. In a subset of weather-forecasting, models anticipate the development and trajectory of hurricanes. We track seismic activity to forecast earthquakes with some measure of warning.

In one of the most interesting applications of mathematical modeling, scientists searching outer space for planets like ours have now identified at least one in a solar system beyond our own. How? With instruments so precise that they can measure differences in light as fine as turning a flashlight on and off on the moon. Slight dimming in measurable light is evidence of a shadow being cast along a path – proof of planets. (more…)