Tagged: SOX

Double Standard

Humans are often entertained by illustrations of absurdity through reality.

For instance, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew months ago said he’d like to address tax inversions but lacked authority.  Yesterday, Treasury imposed rules to limit inversions. My reading of Section Two of the U.S. Constitution reveals no lawmaking authority vested in the executive branch.

I could compile a book of examples. I won’t.  Instead, I’ll offer one for the IR chair and the public-company executive suite. In 1975, Congress added Section 13f to the Securities Act to “increase the public availability of information regarding the securities holdings of institutional investors.” I was eight years old then and had no idea I’d spend my adult life working in the capital markets with thus far no update to the provision.

NIRI CEO Jeff Morgan said in his weekly note to members yesterday that the Board had held its annual meeting with the SEC to discuss disclosure. “I am not sure we came to any concrete agreement on how we might traverse down the road to improving disclosure,” Jeff wrote.  He was talking about the burden of it.

In August 2000, the SEC imposed Regulation Fair Disclosure (Reg FD) to “promote the full and fair disclosure of information by publicly traded companies and other issuers.” Following and vastly increasing disclosure-costs was The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX as we call it), passed by the U.S. Congress to protect shareholders and the general public from accounting fraud and errors and to improve accuracy in corporate disclosures. I remember that my company spent about $2 million as a small-cap NASDAQ-traded firm with $200 million in revenues complying with Section 404 and other requirements the first year.

I recall an ensuing variety of rules through the Financial Accounting Standards Board and SEC Staff Accounting Bulletins, all adding time, effort, cost and disclosure. (more…)