Tagged: tick size; SEC

Tray Dat

We’ll be listening in the car to a song on satellite radio’s The Pulse, trying to keep current, and I’ll say to Karen, “Do you understand what he’s saying?”

You may feel the same way about equity-market rules. Take for instance the Trade-At Rule.  No it’s not Tray Dat, but I think I heard that in a song on The Pulse.  We didn’t hear something sounding like Tray Dat during the Little River Band concert Sunday at Denver’s Hudson Gardens, the band touring 39 years with a revolving cast still delivering goose-bump harmonies on Lady, Take It Easy on Me, Cool Change and Reminiscing.

Anyway, the Trade-At Rule matters to IR because it sharply impacts the buyside and sellide – your two core constituencies. And if the CFO stops you in the hallway and says, “What do you think of this Tray Dat thing the SEC is considering?” you don’t want to stammer.

So here’s what’s happening.  The SEC in June directed exchanges and Finra, the regulatory body for brokerages, to develop a plan for testing wider spreads in stocks. The SEC wants three test groups for a year-long pilot program.  All three will include stocks with market caps under $5 billion, volume below one million daily shares, and prices over $2.

One group, the control, will trade as it does now.  The second will have greater tick sizes, or spreads between prices for buying and selling shares, called the best Bid (to buy) and Offer (to sell). The plan is still conceptual – the SEC in June gave market participants 60 days to craft their proposal – but it’s probable we’d see five-cent spreads.

The third group will incorporate along with bigger ticks another idea: The Trade-At Rule. Best way to describe it? If you’ve read the book Flash Boys, there’s a story Brad Katsuyama tells about seeing 25,000 shares for sale on his screen, and readying his own order to buy those 25,000 shares. His finger is poised over the keyboard, counting down, 5-4-3-2-1…click. He presses the button to buy – and the orders disappear and he gets but a small portion of what he could clearly see was available.

The Trade-At Rule would ostensibly remedy this problem by prohibiting somebody from front-running the displayed price. It would seem to force trades out of dark pools where prices can’t be seen, onto exchanges, where they can. There are exemptions for big block dark pools like Liquidnet and Aqua, and for exchanges with the best price right before the new “marketable” order arrives. (more…)