Tagged: tick size study

Sizing Ticks

Ticks are blood-sucking insects, about how regulators have viewed spreads between stock prices.

Country singer Brad Paisley sings that he’d like to walk you through a field of wildflowers and check you for ticks. As a kid in tick country on Oregon’s Snake River breaks, I pulled plasma-bloated fatsos off my skin and watched my grandmother touch match-reddened tweezers to protuberant tick buttocks on my grandfather’s scalp.

Now the Securities and Exchange Commission is studying ticks. It’s in regulatory parlance SEC Release No. 73511, File No. 4-657.  You can comment by email at rule-comments@sec.gov, or on the website, here (include “File No. 4-657” in any case).

Fittingly, we’re in New York this week where ticks began, a timely escape from the season’s first deep freeze in Denver.  Your stock trades in penny increments, or ticks, thanks to rules created by the SEC in the 20th century.

The belief then was that brokers were charging too much with wide spreads in securities that jobbed small investors. Shrink ticks to desiccated carcasses and mom and pop would win went the reasoning. Fifteen years after slimming ticks, the SEC has ordered a study on widening them. The SEC didn’t say it made a mistake last century. It just told exchanges, “See if there’s a better way.”

I’ve read File No. 4-657 from introduction to footnotes and definitions.  We’ve summarized before but hitting highlights, the exchanges have proposed three clusters and a control group comprising effectively all the 1,750-ish small-caps in the market. Stocks will quote in five-cent spreads but trade anywhere between, or trade in five-cent spreads, or trade at five-cent spreads with a “trade-at” rule, this latter blasted by brokers because it prohibits undercutting prices at exchanges. (more…)

Without Your Knowledge

Facebook collaborated with two respected universities to study your emotional responses when shown different kinds of news. Without your knowledge.

We learned in June, you might recall, that Cornell, the University of California at San Francisco and Facebook delved into the doings and feelings of 700,000 of us folks without so much as a by-your-leave. The aim was unalloyed, as aims often begin when people sit in rooms with statistics and contemplate how to study them.  Do users post negative prose if they’re exposed to adverse news?

It seems innocuous, sure. I’m not knocking the social network and that’s not the point of today’s piece. If you’re sharing your innermost feelings with a community of one billion, your expectation for inclusion on the distribution list for the memo about a psychological study should be a number approaching zero.

Speaking of memos you didn’t get, we wrote two weeks ago that the SEC had in June ordered the stock exchanges and Finra, regulator for brokers, to craft a program for larger tick-sizes in small-caps. The plan is out. Without input from public companies. But you can yet weigh in. We’ll come to it.

There are four groups, not three as we’d initially thought. The three test groups will contain about 400 entities each with prices over $2, volume under a million shares, and market-cap of $5 billion or less, and will study trading in five-cent increments.

Lest you suppose this is the backwater of the market, there are only 754 large-cap companies in the Wilshire 5000.  Not enough to constitute two test groups. Most of the stocks trading publicly fit criteria for this proposed program.

That makes this plan more than a test. It’s a functional repudiation of Regulation National Market System. But instead of admitting its errors, the SEC simply ordered the exchanges to propose an alternative, thus permitting regulators to sidestep responsibility for screwing up 80% of the marketplace. (more…)