Tagged: trading spreads

Having never gone to a Neighborhood Pumpkin-Carving, we were wistful when squirrels promptly devoured the face off our finished product (marked “easiest” in the booklet of pumpkin-carving patterns we purchased). Ah well. What some consider a jack-o-lantern others see as a meal.

Speaking of scary, for those keeping record we note more currency-driven events to explain to your executives. First, the European Central Bank last week threw down the red carpet for Greek lenders, so the dollar dived and stocks soared on changes to perceived risk and anticipated further global currency-printing. On Halloween, Japan intervened to weaken the yen by buying other currencies, so the dollar strengthened (less supply, same demand) and markets plunged. On Nov 1, fear of setbacks on the Greece deal drove risk managers back to the dollar, pushing it up and stocks down more.

US markets should be proxies for fundamental value and forward multiples of collective corporate cash flows. Not meters for currency fluctuations. Happy Halloween.

Speaking of meters, there is Tom Peterffy, immigrant, billionaire, and architect of automated trading. Peterffy ranked 236th on Forbes’ list of the 400 richest in 2009, fruits of long labor revolutionizing how stocks trade. Peterffy, founder of Timber Hill and Interactive Brokers, pioneers in automated multi-asset-class electronic trading, believes automated trading goes too far. (more…)

Did you see the Nicole Kidman film ten years ago called The Others?

A woman becomes convinced her house is haunted. In case you’ve not seen it, I’ll save the twist, but it’s the twist that matters. Things are not as they seem.

Crack WSJ markets writer Tom Lauricella asked in a page one article Oct 18 if markets are cracked. Traders he surveyed said building positions in stocks is getting harder. Liquidity is thin. Spreads are rising. Getting trades done – completing an order to buy or sell shares within projected price ranges – is challenging now in the most liquid names.

In the movie The Others, the problem is perspective. The answer to what’s going on depends on how you look at it. Since we’re limited by the camera and the perspective of the central characters, the reality of the problem doesn’t manifest itself till near the end.

In markets, it seems like liquidity is the problem. But what if it’s a matter of perspective? Classically, liquidity is capital. Today it’s somebody on the other side of the trade. Are they the same? No. What’s on the other side of most trades? A machine. Why is it there? Incentives. It’s not there because it’s committing capital. It’s there because it’s paid to be there. (more…)