Search Results for: creations

Block Monopoly

This year’s rare midweek July 4 prompted a pause for the Market Structure Map to honor our Republic built on limited government and unbounded individual liberty. Long may it live.

Returning to our market narrative: Did you know that 100% of Exchange Traded Fund creations and redemptions occur in block trades?

If you’ve got 48 minutes and a desire to understand ETFs, catch my podcast (you can get our ETF White Paper too) with IR Magazine’s Jeff Cossette.

In stocks, according to publicly reported data, three-tenths of one percent (0.3%) of NYSE trades are blocks (meaning 99.7% are non-block).  The Nasdaq compiles data differently but my back-of-the-envelope math off known data says blocks are about the same there – a rounding error of all trades.

Blocks have shrunk due to market regulation. Rules say stock trades must meet at a single national price between the best bid to buy and offer to sell.  That price relentlessly changes, especially for the biggest thousand stocks comprising 95% of volume and market cap (north of $2.5 billion to make the cut) so the amount of shares available at the best price is most times tiny.

We track the data.  At July 9, the average Russell 1000 stock traded 13,300 times per day in 160-share increments.  If you buy and sell shares 200 at a time like high-speed traders or algorithmic routers that dissolve and spray orders like crop-dusters, it’s great.

But if you buy cheese by the wheel, so to speak, getting a slice at a time means you’re not in the cheese-wheel buying business but instead in the order-hiding business. Get it? You must trick everybody into thinking you want a slice, not a wheel.

The cause? Market structure. Regulation National Market System, the regime governing stock trades, says one exchange must send to another any trade for which a better price exists there (so big exchanges pay traders to set price. IEX, the newest, doesn’t).

Put simply, exchanges are forced by rules to share prices. Exchanges cannot give preference to any customer over another.

ETFs get different rules. Shares are only created in blocks, and only traded between ETF creators and their only customers, called Authorized Participants.

I’m not making this up. When Blackrock wants more ETF shares, they create them in blocks only.  From Blackrock’s IVV S&P 500 ETF prospectus: Only an Authorized Participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants).

Why can ETFs offer preference when it’s against the law for exchanges? Fair question. There is no stated answer. The unstated one is that nobody would make markets in ETFs if a handful of firms didn’t have an unassailable competitive advantage, a sure chance to make money (why ETF fees are so low).

Again from the IVV prospectus:

Prior to trading in the secondary market, shares of the Fund are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of 50,000 shares or multiples thereof.

Each “creator” or authorized participant (an “Authorized Participant”) has entered into an agreement with the Fund’s distributor, BlackRock Investments, LLC (the “Distributor”), an affiliate of BFA. A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the Distributor and the Fund, generally takes place when an Authorized Participant deposits into the Fund a designated portfolio of securities (including any portion of such securities for which cash may be substituted) and a specified amount of cash approximating the holdings of the Fund in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units.

And down a bit further (emphasis in all cases mine):

Only an Authorized Participant may create or redeem Creation Units with the Fund. Authorized Participants may create or redeem Creation Units for their own accounts or for customers, including, without limitation, affiliates of the Fund.

Did you catch that last bit? The creator of ETF shares – only in blocks, off the secondary market (which means not in the stock market) – may create units for itself, for its customers, or even for the Fund wanting ETF shares (here, Blackrock).

And the shares are not created at the best national bid to buy or offer to sell but at NAV – Net Asset Value.

Translating to English: ETF shares are created between two cloistered parties with no competition, off the market, in blocks, at a set price – and then sold to somebody else who will have to compete with others and can only trade at the best national price, which continually changes in the stock market, where no one gets preference and prices are incredibly unstable.

It’s a monopoly.

Two questions:  Why do regulators think this is okay? The SEC issued exemptive orders to the 1940 Investment Company Act (can the SEC override Congress?) permitting it.

We wrote about the enormous size of ETF creations and redemptions. Which leads to Question #2: Why wouldn’t this process become an end unto itself, displacing fundamental investment?

The Actionable Hoax

What’s actionable?

It’s a buzzword of business and the investor-relations profession. And, yes, my title violates a rule of grammar because you can’t tell if the topic is a hoax about actionability or if a hoax out there has proved actionable.

We’ll answer using the market. Like this: Trade-war threats are wrecking markets!  Right?

Wrong.  Pundits tying moves in the market to headlines don’t understand market structure. Suppose you’re getting “actionable” information from pundits who don’t know how the market works. Are the recommended actions reliable?

While you ponder that, consider this: If trade concerns for tech stocks caused the correction in February, why did the Nasdaq hit an all-time high June 20? Did the same money that rejected the market back then on trade fears three months later without resolution to those concerns pay more?

You can say, “No, they were sellers.” Okay, so who bought?

Market experts are often offering actionable intelligence based on outdated ideas. But they have a duty to understand how the market works and what the money is doing.

In fact, these two pillars – how the market works, what the money is doing – should be the bedrock for understanding markets.

What’s the money doing?  It’s not choosing to be directed by rational thought. We know  because a vast sea of data on fund flows tells us so. If we as investors or investor-relations practitioners continue doing what we did before fund flows surged to passive money, who is the bigger fool?

Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) are driving 50% of market volume now. They are passive vehicles. But they uniquely among investment products permit ETF creators like Blackrock and Vanguard a step-up in tax basis through creation and redemption.

How? Say NFLX is up 100% in three months, imputing tax costs to ETF shares. Creators of ETFs collateralized by NFLX shares will put it in redemption baskets exchanged to brokers for returned ETF shares.  (NOTE: If you don’t know how ETFs work, ask us for our ETF whitepaper.)  NFLX then plunges as brokers sell and short it.

Five days later, the ETF creator can bring NFLX back now in a creation basket of new ETF shares that it will issue only in exchange for NFLX – laundered of tax consequences.

Apply this to the Technology sector (or the whole market for that matter).  We just had Russell index rebalances, and Technology is a big part of market cap.  S&P indices rebalanced June 22 and Technology is over 25% of the S&P 500 now.

This week is quarter-end window-dressing. ETFs are trying to bleed taxes off runups in Tech stocks.  We could see it coming in Sentiment by June 14, when it topped, signaling downside, and when behavioral volatility indicated big price-swings. Data say we have another rough day coming this week.

Headlines may help prioritize what gets tax-washed, so to speak, but the motivation is not investment. It’s aiming at picking gains and packing off tax consequences.

The market is driven far more by these factors than rational thought, which we know by studying the data. ETF creations and redemptions are hundreds of billions of dollars monthly. Inflows and outflows from buy-and-hold funds are nonexistent by comparison.

Ergo, it can’t be rational thought driving the market no matter the talking heads declaiming trade threats.

It’s what lawyers call a “fact pattern.” ETFs dominate passive investment, drive 50% of market volume, depend on tax efficiency, which process is an arbitrage trade that involves a continual shift of hundreds of billions monthly in underlying assets, and a corresponding continual shift in collateralizing assets called stocks – with market-makers profiting, and ETF creators profiting – without regard to market direction.

It’s poor fodder for a 24-hour news cycle. But it explains market behavior. Moves have become more pronounced because money stopped pouring into US equities via ETFs this year. Volatility exploded because getting tax efficiency got harder.

Which brings us to the “actionable” hoax. The word “actionable” says consumers of products or services are fixated on a prompt, a push, an imprimatur.

Fine. But flinging the word around causes investors and IR professionals to miss what matters more, and first.  Investors and public companies should be asking: “How does this service or that tool help me understand what the money behind stocks is doing?”

Ask your service provider to explain how your stock trades. Then ask us to explain it.

If they don’t match, ask why. The beginning point of correct action is an understanding of what you can and cannot control, and how the environment in which you operate works.

Take the weather. We can’t control it. But it determines the viability of our actions. The same applies to understanding market structure. It determines the viability of actions.

If you want to learn market structure, ask us how, IR professionals and investors.  It’s the starting point. What you think is actionable may be a hoax. Compare how the market works to what you’re doing. Do they match? If not, change your actions. We’ll help you.

Liar’s Poker

We’re back! We recommend Barbados but we didn’t see Rihanna.

We also endorse floating around the Grenadines on a big catamaran turning brown and losing track of time. We had rum off the shore of Petit Tabac where Elizabeth set Captain Jack Sparrow’s rum store afire.

Meanwhile, back in reality the dollar rose and interest rates fell, and Italy slouched into confusion, and Argentina dodged a currency crisis for now, and Venezuela…well, Venezuela is like that rum fire Elizabeth set in Pirates of the Caribbean.

I at last read Liar’s Poker, Michael Lewis’s first book (and also Varina, by Charles Frazier, a lyrical novel that sighs like wind through live oaks, imagining life in the eyes of Mrs. Jefferson Davis).

With the boat and the sea taking us far from cell towers, we hit the power buttons and blinked out and I with cold Carib at hand, the beer of the Caribbean, sailed through Mr. Lewis’s time at Salomon Brothers in the bond frenzy of the 1980s.

Mr. Lewis explains how a Federal Reserve decision in Oct 1979 by then chairman Paul Volcker to fix the supply of money and float interest rates stuffed the turkey for Salomon. Overnight, bonds moved from conservative investments held to produce income, to speculative instruments driven by bets on big swings in prices.

For Salomon, the money was in toll-taking. They bought bonds from those selling at incorrect prices and sold them to others willing to buy at incorrect prices. They kept a middleman’s sliver. Do it enough and you’re rich. If you’ve not read the book, do so. There’s verisimilitude for today’s stock market.

The Fed abandoned floating interest rates in 1982, reverting to influencing the Fed Funds rate as it still does today (setting interest rates and flexing the money supply). But speculation on price-changes is now rampant, having spread into everything from currencies to equities.

It matters because anytime supply and demand are not the principal price-setters, a market cannot be depended on to offer reliable fundamental signals. The US stock market thanks to Exchange Traded Funds now may be the most arbitraged in human history.

You might be thinking, Tim, did time on the boat not dump your ETF cache? Also, why do I care?

I return to the ETF theme because investors and public companies continue to assign the market disproportionately fundamental interpretations. You should care because Salomon is gone, swept away on the tides of history because it didn’t keep up. Are we keeping up?

The motivation behind the two parties to every ETF creation and redemption – and neither one of them is you – is capturing a price-spread.  It’s not investment.  Yes, you as an investor may buy ETFs as an investment. But the parties creating and redeeming them are doing so to make money on how prices change.

That’s arbitrage. And what determines the value of investments isn’t who holds them but who buys or sells them (this is the flaw in thinking your stock reflects value assigned by buy-and-hold investors).

In a way, it’s what Mr. Lewis describes in Liar’s Poker, where Salomon merchandised the market’s ignorance about what priced bonds.

How many people understand that ETFs are not managing the money they spent buying ETF shares? ETFs have everyone believing they’re buying a pooled investment when it’s not. Whose fault is it?  Don’t we all bear a responsibility to understand what we’re buying, or what’s affecting the value of our traded shares, companies?

ETFs are the dominant stock financial vehicle of this very long bull market. What matters to those behind trillions of dollars of ETF share-creations and redemptions isn’t the objective of the ETF – but how the prices of ETFs change versus the underlying assets used to collateralize their creation.

Thus a fundamental tremor like trouble in Italy becomes volcanic, spewing molten lava all over stocks. The true driver is arbitrage. Bets. Liar’s Poker. Let’s not be fooled again.

Westworld

The smash HBO series Westworld is a lot like the stock market: It has the appearance of reality but is populated by machines (which are trying to take over in both places).

What the market lacks in gratuitous nudity it more than compensates for with a veneer that far exceeds what the Westworld operators call “the narrative.”  Most think the market’s narrative is headlines and fundamentals.  Examine what the money is doing, the rules of the market, the way exchanges match trades today, and it’s the opposite.

Fundamentals are the sideshow. The sellside has imploded. Blackrock, Vanguard and State Street cut costs by cutting them out. Index and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), dominating investment the past decade, don’t follow fundamentals.  We just hired a person from Janus because stock-picking is like the androids in Westworld: subject to repeated obliteration.

JP Morgan and Goldman Sachs both have said publicly that 10% of their trading volumes now are active investment. Sellside analysts in droves are trying to get investor-relations jobs. Why then is IR spending 85% of its effort on the buyside and sellside?

And the earnings-versus-expectations model is misdirection. It’s not for buy-and-hold investors. It’s for arbitragers. It’s an opportunity to bet. Investors don’t change their minds that way.

What’s exploded is the use of derivatives. The same handful of banks from Goldman Sachs to UBS that perpetuate earnings vs. expectations execute 90% of customer equity orders and handle 95% of the derivatives market.  They know the direction of equity flows so they can hedge long or short. Their best customers are hedge funds and high-speed firms profiting on price-changes.

These same big firms are ETF authorized participants, which have created and redeemed some $2 trillion of ETF shares already this year, contributing to whopping market volatility. Actual inflows to equities are 2% of that figure! It’s arbitrage.

We’ve become the hosts – as the androids in Westworld are called. Unwitting contributors to a storyline. What if we suspended all our effort at outreach to the buyside and sellside…and nothing happened?

Berkshire Hathaway doesn’t hold an earnings call. Tesla’s Elon Musk went off over banal analyst questions, but questions don’t buy or sell stocks and TSLA is right where the math signaled (about $301), up on – you guessed it – ETF creations, arbitrage.

You don’t want to hear this? Do you prefer to live in Westworld, hosts for a narrative not of your design? Don’t do that.  IR is the chief intelligence function. You’re supposed to know what’s going on.  We rarely stress it here, but I’m saying it today. Market Structure Analytics, which we invented, can tell you everything you need to escape Westworld:

-What’s setting your price every day

-The demographic composition of your volume by behavior

-The trends of behavioral change

-When Active money buys or sells, and if it’s growth, GARP or value

-If your investors are engaged

-The risk from directional bets and whether they’re long or short

-The presence of deal arbitrage, Activism and short attacks (and likely success)

-Borrowing trends in your shares

-How passive investment affects stock performance

-Visual indications of short-term market cycles including how ETFs work

-Key trends and drivers

-Key metrics for knowing if your equity is healthy or not

-Forecasted prices (with 95% accuracy five days out)

-Earnings expectation models

-Predictive Sentiment for Overbought and Oversold conditions

-Why your shares behave differently than peers or the market

You might say, “So?”

Public companies have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interest of shareholders, which includes understanding how the market is using those shares.  If IR was a business division, we’d expect nothing less than a full SWOT disposition. IR is the equity product manager – arguably as vital as any business division. You need data.

Analytics should first enable you to see important trends and drivers – in consumer behavior, in a business, in your equity.  That’s the starting point for actions. IR has fallen into a rut of saying it wants actionability – but without first understanding equity drivers.

Public companies have over the past 20 years let intermediaries make rules that work well for intermediaries like exchanges selling data and technology services but poorly for ourselves and long-term money. The problem is IR behaves still like it’s 20 years ago.

We remedy that deficiency.  If you want to see how, give us 15-30 minutes by web meeting to show you why Market Structure Analytics should be considered a vital part of being public today (and you investors, we’ll soon have a solution for you too!).

The Matrix

FactSet says quarterly earnings are up 23% from a year ago. Why have stocks declined?

There’s an inclination to grasp at fundamental explanations. Yet stock pickers generally don’t reactively sell because most times they must be fully invested (meaning to sell, they must buy).

Blackrock, Vanguard and State Street claim for Exchange-Traded Funds tracking the S&P 500 or Russell 1000 that turnover is 3-5%. (Editorial note: Those figures exclude creations and redemptions of ETF shares totaling trillions annually – a story we’ve told exclusively in the Market Structure Map.)

If investors are not responsible, who or what is?  Machines. By market rule all trades wanting to set the best bid to buy or offer to sell are automated – running on an algorithm. Why? Because the best price can be anyplace at anytime in the market system, and trades must move fluidly to it.

Thus, machines have become hugely influential in determining how prices are calculated. An amalgam of broker algorithms, smart routers and exchange order types are continually calculating the probability of higher or lower prices and completing a trade.

By our measures, back on Apr 19 the probability of calculating higher prices dropped. Why? Perhaps risk calculations for asset managers ordered rotation from overweighted equities or a need to slough off capital gains from ETFs (stuff mathematical models routinely do).

We have a mathematical representation for it: The market was Overbought. It doesn’t mean people are overpaying for fundamentals. It says machines will lack data to arrive at higher prices.  What follows this condition is nearly always a flat or lower market.

We know then that math arising from market rules is more powerful than a 23% increase in earnings. That should disturb stock pickers and public companies. If the market is The Matrix (if you’re younger than the movie, watch it to understand the reference), what are we all doing straining so hard to be outliers?

And why do machines possess the capacity to trump value-creation?

Good question.

By the way, the math is now changing. It’s resolving toward a mean.  We measure these price-setting propensities with a 10-point scale, the ModernIR Behavioral Index. Most of the time the stock market trades between 4.0 and 6.0, mean-reverting to 5.0 or thereabouts.

It returns to the middle because rules propel it there. Stocks must trade between the best bid or offer. What lies there? The average price. What do indexes and ETFs hew to? Averages.  We’ve explained this before.

When the market slops beyond 6.0, a mean-reversion is coming.  When it drops below 4.0, it signals upward mean-reversion. The market has descended from about 6.5 a week ago to 5.2 yesterday. The market will soon level off or rise as it did microcosmically yesterday, a day of extremes that ended back near midway (but it’s not down to 4.0, notice).

If math is a more reliable indicator of the future than earnings, why is everybody fixated on earnings versus expectations? What if that model is obsolete? And is that a bad thing?

I don’t think so. The earnings-versus-expectations convention promotes arbitrage. Shouldn’t capital-formation power the market?

Big Movers

You can’t expect the stock market to reflect earnings. I’ll explain.

By week’s end, 20% of the S&P 500 will have reported, and earnings are up 17% over the same period last year so far (normalized to about 7% sans federal corporate tax reform legislation).

Yardeni Research, Inc. reports that price-to-earnings ratios in various categories of the market are not misaligned with history.  The S&P 500 trades just over 16 times forward expected earnings, about where it did in 2015, and in 2007 before the financial crisis, and well below levels before Sep 11, 2001.

Sure, by some measures valuations are extreme. Viewed via normative metrics, however, the market is as it’s been. From 1982-2000, PE ratios were generally rising.  From there to 2012, they were generally falling. Yet between we had multiple major market corrections.

Which returns us to my incendiary opening assertion that earnings today don’t drive stocks. What does? The money setting prices. Let me explain.

Buy-and-hold money tends to buy, and hold. Most conventional “long” equity funds must be fully invested, which means to buy something they must sell something else.  Buying and selling introduces tax, trading-commission, and volatility costs, which can cause stock-picking investors to underperform broad indexes.

The Investment Company Institute reported that 2016 turnover rates among equity funds averaged 34%, or about a third of positions annually. Passive index and exchange-traded funds tout low turnover. State Street, sponsor for the world’s largest ETF, SPY, claimed 2017 turnover was 3%.

We’ll come to the fallacy of low turnover in ETFs.

First, Big Reason #1 for the movement of stocks is arbitrage. Follow the money. Using our proprietary statistical measures of behavior in stock trades, nearly 46% of market volume (20-day ave.) in the Russell 1000 (which is over 90% of market cap) came from high-speed traders.

They are not investors. These machines trade tick data in baskets, aiming most times to own nothing at day’s end. The objective is to profit on intraday price-moves.  For instance, 52% of Facebook’s daily trading volume is high-speed machines. Less then 9% is Active investment by stock-pickers.

Viewed another way, there’s a 46% chance that the price of stocks reflects machines trading the tick. Since less than 12% of Russell 1000 volume was fundamental, there is but a one-in-eight chance that earnings set prices. High-speed trading is arbitrage – profiting on price-differences.

Don’t fundamentals price the market long-term? Again, that would be true if the majority of the money setting prices in the market was motivated by fundamentals. That hasn’t been true this century.

How about fund flows?  Assembling data from EPFR, Lipper and others and accounting for big outflows in February, about $40 billion has come into US stocks this year.

Using Investment Company Institute data and estimates for Mar and Apr this year, ETFs have by comparison created and redeemed some $1.5 TRILLION of shares. Fund flows are less than 3% of that figure.

These “in-kind” exchanges between ETF creators and big brokers that form the machinery of the ETF market are excluded from portfolio turnover. If they were counted, turnover rates in ETFs would dwarf those for conventional funds. And the objective behind creations and redemptions is not investment.

ETF creators make money by charging brokers fees for these transactions (which are tax-free to them) and investing the collateral. Brokers then trade ETFs and components and indexes to profit on the creations (new ETF shares sold to investors) and redemptions (returning ETF shares to ETF creators in exchange for collateral to sell and short).

Neither of these parties is trying to produce an investment return per se. They are profiting on how prices change – which is arbitrage (and if ETF creations are greater than redemptions, they permit more money to chase the same goods, lifting markets).

Summarizing: The biggest sources of movement of money and prices are machines trading the tick, and ETF creators and brokers shuttling tax-free collateral and shares back and forth by the hundreds of billions. If pundits describe the market in fundamental terms, they are not doing the math or following the money.

And when the market surges or plunges, it’s statistically probable that imbalances in these two behaviors are responsible.

Can It Last?

It’s the number one question.  Tack “how long” on the front.

I’m asked all the time: “Tim, do you think the stock market is sustainable? Are fundamentals driving it or is this a bubble? Stock buybacks?  The Fed is behind it, right? Isn’t bitcoin proof of irrational exuberance?”

And everybody with an opinion is asked, and answers. I’ve offered mine (read The 5.5 Market from last week) and I’ll add today what we’ve further learned about the behavior of money.

Speaking of money, Karen and I joke that we miss the recession. Hotels were a bargain.  They gave you free tickets to shows if you just came to Las Vegas. Vacations were affordable (I’m not making light of great stock returns but if we give it all back, how is that helpful?).

Now suppose at the same time interest rates would rise. People and companies with too much debt would suffer, sure. But society would save money and take on less debt. That’s what higher interest rates encourage. From Hammurabi in Babylon until fairly recently we understood this to be the formula for prosperity.

“Quast, do you know nothing about contemporary behavioral economics? What kind of idiot would think it’s better to save money and avoid debt?  Economists agree that debt and spending drive the global consumption economy.”

Ask your financial advisor if you should borrow money and spend more, or save money and invest it.  So how come the Federal Reserve encourages borrowing and spending?

Recessions have purpose – and they’re packed with opportunity!  Seriously. They reset the economic calculus.

I’ll give you an example from the Wall Street Journal yesterday, which reported that here in Denver we have 16,000 vacant metro apartments, most in the luxury category. And 22,000 more are being built. Since they’re unaffordable, the city has launched a program to subsidize rents.

This is the kind of warped outcome one gets from promoting debt and spending, and it’s influencing our stock market too. I’m not the least worried because I know boundless opportunity awaits when prices reset, and that’s the right way to see it.  Warren Buffett said it’s unwise to pay more for a thing than it’s worth.  All right, I look forward to attractive prices ahead.

And prices are products of the behavior of money.  Last week we described how the market could not correctly be credited with rational valuation because stock-picking was not the principal behavior. Over the past ten years, all the NET new inflows into US equities have gone to index and exchange-traded funds. They follow a benchmark. They don’t pick stocks.

They also rarely sell them. If things are bought and not sold, prices rise.  There is a paucity of stocks for sale. In its 2016 prospectus for the S&P 500 ETF SPY, State Street said its turnover – proportion of holdings bought and sold – was 4%.  The fund that year, the latest available, had $197 billion in net asset value. Four percent is about $8 billion.

Yet SPY traded $25 billion daily in 2016 (still does!), about three times the entire annual fund turnover. Explanation? Right there on page 2 of the prospectus: The Trust’s portfolio turnover rate does not include securities received or delivered from processing creations or redemptions of Units.

On page 30 we learn this:  For the year ended September 30, 2016, the Trust had in-kind contributions, in-kind redemptions, purchases and sales of investment securities of $177,227,631,568, $167,729,988,725, $7,783,624,798, and $6,444,954,759, respectively.

Translating to English, it means brokers called Authorized Participants created $177 billion worth of new ETF shares by exchanging assemblages of stocks for them that were not counted as sales by SPY. It counted sales of only about $8 billion – as I said above.

The functional turnover rate for SPY is closer to 100%. If it really was, the market would be volatile. Prices would fall as shares hit the market. SPY drives 10% of the entire stock market’s dollar volume.

But what trades is ETF shares. The creation and redemption process occurs away from the market in some secretive block-transaction fashion that means the natural buying or selling that would otherwise be done is not happening.

Selling lowers prices. The absence of selling, the replacement of selling with trading in ETF shares predicated primarily on price-differences – arbitrage – produces a market that relentlessly rises with very little volatility.

And which notably means investors don’t actually own anything when they buy ETF shares. If they did, that $177 billion SPY exchanged for ETF shares would carry a taxable ownership interest, and transaction costs. It doesn’t.

Think about that.

When the recession comes because of this bizarre displacement of actual buying and selling by derivatives, I look greatly forward to all the bargains, the affordable vacation homes in desirable places, the cheap stocks, and the free show tickets in Las Vegas.

I just can’t tell you when. The wise are always prepared.

Swapping the Future

Whole swaths of stocks moved 3% yesterday. You might thank Dodd-Frank for it, even if David Tepper gets credit (if you heard the Appaloosa Management founder’s interview you know what I mean).

To understand how, ever heard of a Rube Goldberg Machine? It’s an unnecessarily complex device for doing something simple. Cartoonist Reuben “Rube” Goldberg turned his own name into a rubric for obtuse machination with humorous creations like the self-operating napkin.

So your stock rose sharply for no apparent reason. Some will say it’s because David Tepper, who made $2 billion last year on a belief in strong equities, said on CNBC that “shorts should get out the shovels because they’ll be buried.”

But the answer to why your stock and maybe your sector yesterday moved, and how Dodd-Frank is a factor may be more like a Rube Goldberg Machine. MSCI global indexes rebalance today, and ahead of that we’ve seen surging high-frequency trading, telling us money is benchmarking ahead to equity indexes at newly higher rates. Options expire tomorrow and Friday, with VIX volatility instruments lapsing May 22, giving arbitragers better opportunity to pairs-trade.

And Dodd-Frank’s deadlines on swap-clearing rules take effect in June, so this is the last pre-central-swap-clearing options-expirations period, which set dates for swaps too.

Ever heard of single-stock futures? It’s a way to go long or short shares without buying or borrowing. There’s even an exchange called OneChicago owned by the Chicago Board Options Exchange, CME Group, and Interactive Brokers, for electronically trading these contracts where two parties agree to exchange a set number of shares of a given stock in the future at a price determined today. Also popular are Narrow-Based Indexes – futures contracts on a small set of securities, say, from an industry or subsector. (more…)