Tagged: index funds

Constituents

Is you is, or is you ain’t, my constituents?

If you know cinema’s Coen Brothers and the epically hilarious 2000 movie “O Brother, Where Art Thou,” you’re smiling. You remember the scene, the southern accent.

In geopolitics, a sweeping referendum last weekend reunited Crimea with Mother Russia but we heard nothing about the Latino vote or the union vote or the male vote. Demographics, we gather, weren’t crucial to Putin’s putsch. The constituents supporting secession were of a cloth.

Say you run a clothing retailer on the cutting edge of young fashion. Slicing your demographics with analytics drawn from your in-store inventory management system, you find that females aged 18-34 drive half your revenues. These are your core constituents, and you’ll concentrate on keeping them happy. But you realize too that growth takes more than one group. You craft a plan with products, advertisements and placement to expand patronage from other demographic segments.

The equity market has core constituents too. Your active holders, the ones who measure story and strategy. We divide them further with growth, value and growth-at-reasonable-price (GARP) characteristics, and often finer still.

Had we a marketplace where consumption of the product – your shares – was only about story and strategy, we’d call it a wrap and the movie would end. Yet this constituency taken together is still just one: Active investors.

Blackrock is the world’s largest investment manager. Most of its $5 trillion in assets are allocated not according to corporate story but around sector, industry and class. So what do we consider this indexed constituency? We at ModernIR call it Passive investment behavior or simply Indexes/ETFs. (more…)

Sorry we’re late this week! We’re in Las Vegas and the Market Structure Map wanted to stay in Vegas, apparently.

Program trading jumped about 10% in the first few trading days of April, compared to March. We define program trades as mathematical execution in more than one stock at a time that follows a market trend. We believe the increase in part reflects improved institutional and retail commitments to various equity index vehicles. But it also shows how “market neutral” trading strategies that continuously buy and sell a wide variety of securities to achieve small profits when netted out have become mainstream.

It shows up in interesting ways. (more…)