Tagged: taxes

Right Now

“Do you see the market as disingenuous?” 

That’s what the Benzinga host asked me yesterday on a stock-market web program.  I generally do two Benzinga shows per week on market structure, for traders.

“No, I see the market as genuine but not motivated most times by what people talk about,” I said.

The stock market reflects what the money is doing. Well, what’s it doing right now? (Reminds me of the song by Jesus Jones.)

There’s universality, right now, that the Federal Reserve is why stocks struggled to start the week. 

The Fed, which will today tell us what “The Committee” – as it always refers to itself – is thinking about doing. What it says and what it does aren’t always aligned.  That seems disingenuous, but whatever.  The Fed says it may reduce its support for markets. By that we mean the Fed buys mortgages and government debt, so debt is cheaper.

But how do we know if there’s a debt problem if the Fed keeps propping it up and rates keep falling? And debt doesn’t produce prosperity. Savings do.  The Fed is undermining prosperity and encouraging debt and spending.

My financial advisors preach the opposite.  Yours?

Yes, investors buy stocks, hoping they rise faster than the Fed can destroy our purchasing power and savings.  That’s Sisyphus pushing a stone up a hill. When it ends, we’ll be poorer.

That’s still not what the money is doing RIGHT NOW.

Illustration 34823501 / Etfs © Timbrk | Dreamstime.com

It’s getting ready for year-end.  Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) will wring taxes out of appreciated holdings.  Or as Vanguard said in its ETF FAQs in 2019, which I included in an ETF presentation:

“Vanguard ETFs can also use in-kind redemptions to remove stocks that have greatly increased in value (which trigger large capital gains) from their holdings.”

Vanguard says this often happens in December, but it can occur other times too. That firm and other ETF sponsors continually adjust ETF shares outstanding.

Like this: Investors want Technology exposure so they buy VGT, the Vanguard Tech ETF. Vanguard puts a grocery list of stocks in the “creation basket,” and brokers bring some mix of those stocks (and cash) to Vanguard, which gives the brokers an equal value of ETF shares, which the brokers sell for a little more to investors.

Near year-end, ETF sponsors get to do what Vanguard said above. They trade appreciated stocks for ETF shares, especially ones where demand is falling. 

They hit the jackpot in Tech, starting at November options-expirations.  Take NVDA. It’s up 116% this year, even after recent declines. NVDA is in 308 ETFs (for comparison, AAPL at nearly $3 trillion of market cap is in 320).

So Vanguard puts NVDA and similar stocks in the basket to trade for falling ETF shares like VGT.  Vanguard gets to wash out its gains. Brokers can sell NVDA, short NVDA, and buy puts on NVDA.  (These aren’t customer orders so they do what they want.)

The real jackpot, though, is that Vanguard can bring NVDA back with a new tax basis (instead of $150 it’s $285 – and this is how ETFs crush stock-pickers).

You and I can’t do that. Index funds can’t do that. Heck, nobody else but ETFs can, leaving one to wonder how the playing field is leveled by this SEC blanket exemption.  

And voila! We have another reason along with Fast Trading, the machines who don’t own anything at day’s end, why the market can stage dramatic moves that everyone wrongly attributes to the Fed, Covid, a Tweet by Kim Kardashian or whatever.

Because this is what the money is doing. About $1 trillion flowed to ETFs this year.  But there’ve been nearly $6 trillion of these back-and-forth transactions as of October.

And funds are constantly encouraging folks to trade out their index-fund shares for ETFs, making ever more assets eligible to dump via the basket and bring back free of taxes.

It’s vastly larger than the amount of money that’ll tweak quarterly or at some other benchmark period to reflect interest-rate or inflation expectations.

And if this principle holds, it’s POSSIBLE that we have some dramatic moves yet coming in stocks.  Maybe this week and next with options-expirations (through Dec 22). Maybe between now and the new year.

The moral of this story never changes: If you’re responsible for the equity market, you need to understand it.  If you trade it, you need to understand it.  If you invest in it, you need to understand it.

And if you depend on it for your currency, your incentive plans, your balance-sheet strength, public companies, your executive team and board better understand it.

ModernIR is the data-analytics gold standard on market structure. We spend every day of the week helping companies understand the market, so they’re better at being public.

Beating Hearts

As the Dow Jones Industrials surged over 300 points on April Fools Day, the behavior driving it was Exchange Traded Funds, not rational thought reacting to economic data.

But aren’t ETFs manifestations of rational thought? Investors see, say, good Chinese manufacturing data, and pump money into them?

I’m not talking about fund flows.  I’ll explain.

CNBC reported that investors withdrew about $6 billion from stock funds during the first quarter’s epic equity rally. How can stocks soar when money is leaving?

We wrote Mar 20 that tallying fund-flow data in Q4 2018 when the market fell about 20% showed net static conditions. That is, $370 billion left stock-picking portfolios and the same amount shifted to passive funds. If no money left, why did stocks crater?

We should ask why fund flows don’t match market-performance. It seems like everyone is running around with fingers in ears going, “La la la la!” amid these uncomfortable realities.

Bloomberg wrote a wildly compelling piece on “heartbeat trades” Mar 29, taking a cue from FactSet’s Elisabeth Kashner, who first wrote about this ETF phenomenon in late 2017.

The gist is that ETFs somehow get short-term cash or stocks to finance creating ETF shares, which go to the provider of the loan as collateral, and then days later the ETF sponsor provides the bank with high capital-gains stocks equal to the value of the ETF shares, which it receives back.

Follow that?  Money is traded for ETF shares, which in turn are traded for stocks.

(Note: We should also wonder where those stocks came from if the market doesn’t suddenly take a selling hit afterward. Were they borrowed to start?)

The result of this trade is that taxes associated with the stocks are washed out of the ETF portfolio, ostensibly benefiting ETF investors.

Except ETF investors don’t own a share of pooled assets carrying tax liabilities. ETFs are not backed by any assets. The assets moving back and forth between, say, Blackrock and Goldman Sachs in these heartbeat trades belong to Blackrock, not to investors.

So Blackrock gets a tax benefit.

If you as an investor sell appreciated ETF shares, you owe taxes. That is, if you bought ETFs for $20 per share and they go to $30, and you sell them, you have $10 of gains and you’ll owe either ordinary-income or capital-gains taxes.

Not Blackrock et al.  They don’t own ETF shares.  They own collateral. Washed of taxes through processes such as what Bloomberg describes.

Bloomberg acknowledges that the same event – washing capital gains – occurs through the process of creating and redeeming ETF shares in ordinary course. Vanguard says in its ETF FAQs: “Vanguard ETFs can also use in-kind redemptions to remove stocks that have greatly increased in value (which trigger large capital gains) from their holdings.”

That by the way can hit a stock, undermining great fundamentals.

Creations and redemptions are huge. We had an estimated $1 trillion of ETF “gross issuance,” it’s called, in the time ordinary investors yanked $6 billion from stocks.

Might that $1 trillion have SOMETHING to do with how the stock market has behaved?  Read anything about it?

I’ll give you an example of the impact: the April Fools Day’s stock tirade. Brokers knew ETFs were undercollateralized. That is, if ETFs are supposed to, say, hold 500 S&P components in proportion as collateral, the rate of increase of markets in Q1 has meant they’re sampling only – using a handful of the same liquid stocks repeatedly to create and redeem ETF shares.

But they have to square books sometime. Usually month-ends, quarter-ends.

Fast Traders tipped us to it last week by buying and covering shorts.  So the market surged not on investors buying economic news but on ETF bookkeeping, in effect.

What has not happened yet is washing out capital gains. We saw smatterings only at March options-expirations. That shoe awaits, and ETF horizons in the wholesale market where shares are created and redeemed – again, $1 trillion in Q1 2019 – are fleeting.

These facts – not suppositions – matter because financial punditry is describing the market in fundamental terms when it’s being driven by leviathan tax-avoidance and arbitrage around a multi-trillion-dollar ETF creation-redemption process.

For public companies and investors, that means it’s nearly impossible to arrive at reliably fundamental expectations for stocks.