Tagged: Federal Reserve

Adapting

Happy New Year!  We trust you enjoyed last week’s respite from the Market Structure Map.  Now, back to reality!

CNBC is leaving Nielsen for somebody who’ll track viewer data better.  Nielsen says CNBC is off 13% from 2013. CNBC says Nielsen misses people viewing in new ways. Criticize CNBC for seeming to kill a messenger with an unpopular epistle but commend it too for innovating. Maybe Nielsen isn’t metering the right things.

I’m reminded of what we called in my youth “the cow business.” The lament then was the demise of small cattle ranches like the one on which I grew up (20,000 acres is slight by western cow-punching standards). Cowboying was a dying business.

And then ranchers changed. They learned to measure herd data and use new technologies like artificial insemination to boost output. They adapted to the American palate. Today you can’t find a gastropub without a braised short rib or a flatiron steak. On the ranch we ate short ribs when the freezer was about empty.  But you deliver the product the consumer wants.

Speaking of which, a Wall Street Journal article Monday noted the $200 billion of 2014 net inflows Vanguard saw to its passive portfolios, which pushed total assets to $3.1 trillion. By contrast, industry active funds declined $13 billion. That’s a radical swing.  The WSJ yesterday highlighted gravity-defying growth for Exchange-Traded Funds, now with $2 trillion of assets.

The investor-relations profession targets active investors. Yet the investor’s palate wants the flank steak of, say, currency-hedged ETFs (up about $24 billion in 2014) over the filet mignon of big-name stock-pickers. IR is chasing a shrinking herd. (more…)

Risk

We figured if The President goes there it must be nice.

Reality often dashes great expectations but not so with Martha’s Vineyard where we marked our wedding anniversary. From Aquinnah’s white cliffs to windy Katama Beach, through Oak Bluffs (on bikes) to the shingled elegance of Edgartown, the island off Cape Cod is a winsome retreat.

Speaking of retreat, my dad, a Korean Police Action era (the US Congress last declared war in 1943, on Romania. Seriously.) veteran, told me his military commanders never used the word retreat, choosing instead “advance to the rear!”

Is the stock market poised for an advance to the rear? Gains yesterday notwithstanding, our measures of market sentiment reflected in the ten-point ModernIR Behavioral Index dipped to negative this week for the first time since mid-August. Risk is a chrysalis formed in shadows, studied by some with interest but generally underappreciated.

It happened in 2006 in housing, when trader John Paulson recognized it and put on his famous and very big short. Most missed the chrysalis hanging rather elegantly in the mushrooming rafters of the hot residential sector.

It happened in the 17th century Dutch tulip bubble, an archetype for manic markets.  Yet then tulips and buyers didn’t suddenly explode but just the money behind both, as ships from the New World laden with silver and gold flooded Flanders mints with material for coin. Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon.

It’s hard to say if mania is here hanging pupa-esque on the cornices of the capital markets. Most say no though wariness abounds. Mergers are brisk and venture capital has again propagated a Silicon Valley awash in money-losing firms with eye-popping values. Corporate buybacks will surpass $1 trillion in total for 2013-2014, capital raking out shares from markets like leaves falling from turning September trees. (more…)

Beyond Curiosity

Let’s talk about houses.

Let me explain. Twice yesterday I encountered an issue, not a new one though. We were discussing it on a conference call too, preparing for a market-structure session Sept 9 at the NIRI Southwest Regional Conference here in Denver – which if you care about market structure is not to be missed. A highlight, Rajeev Ranjan, central banker with the Chicago Federal Reserve and former algo trader, will explain why the Fed cares whether high-speed traders are gaming equities and derivatives.

Anyway, what issue am I talking about?  I continue to hear executives and investor-relations officers say, “I don’t see why short-term trading matters when we’re focused on long-term investors.”

I hear some of you groaning.  “Quast,” you moan. “We don’t want to keep hearing the same stuff.”  I get that. If you already know the answer, you can cut out of the Market Structure Map early today.  Catch you next week.

The rest of you, if you’ve got a tickling there in the back of your head like a sneeze forming in the nose that you really don’t want the CFO to ask you why market structure matters, then let’s talk about houses.

Big money tracks residential real estate – houses. Just this week we had or will have reports on new home sales, the Federal Home Financing Administration’s housing index, the Case-Shiller Home Price Index, mortgage applications, and pending home sales. Decisions about construction, banking, credit-extension and more depend on these data.  They’re part of certain GDP components.

Now suppose it was unclear who was buying and selling houses, whether the sales were cash or financed, how much of the volume of new and existing home-sales were simply transactions between brokers trying to pump up volumes (suppose it were half!), whether mortgage applications were real or indications of interest that wouldn’t materialize, and 35% of all home-sales were in the dark with nothing more known about them save the net number. (more…)

Big ModernIR News

Some would argue I should’ve hit him.

Only kidding! But let me tell you a story.  I was driving yesterday and saw approaching from the left at a good clip on a skateboard some lout on the sidewalk in backward cap and shorts, head down over his phone and ear buds in. There was a stop sign on his side not on mine but he never looked up and didn’t see me until he clattered into the street, where I’d stopped despite an opposite urge.  He didn’t say thanks or whew or anything, just skittered off, nose in phone. He wasn’t a kid either, probably in his 20s.

This to me is a metaphor for the markets. It’s easy to get discouraged about the future.  More on that in a bit. And that’s not the big news.  This is:

New website.  We’ve been testing our contemporary new internet home, gathering feedback, and have gotten high marks in the soft rollout. So voila! Visit modernir.com, mobile-ready and refreshed by our good advertising friends at Brand Iron here in Denver, who handle lots of things for us. Tell us what you think.

Updated logo. Brand Iron also persuaded us to touch up our image. We think it’s good work, though one observer said, “I hope the market doesn’t move inversely with your squiggle.”

New offices. Third is our new headquarters location on fashionable South Pearl Street in Denver, across from our town’s world-renowned Sushi Den and adjacent to diverse dining opportunities in both directions. Perfect for your next visit!  Stop in and see us at 1490 South Pearl Street, Ste 100, here in Denver.

New Director, Client Services. Finally, we’re proud to announce that Greg Yates has joined our client services team. Greg started with us in June and we haven’t driven him away, thankfully.  A University of Arizona graduate with a CFA, Greg began his capital markets career as a trader in fixed income for PIMCO in 1997, and moved on to trading equities at Banc of America, then to the buyside as an asset manager for a variety of firms including Mellon. Clients, you’ll find Greg a knowledgeable and apt supporter in your efforts to run the coolest and most effective IR programs in our profession. He’ll work under our Vice President of Client Services, Brian Leite. (more…)

CYNK Me

Movie tip:  Karen and I took our visiting teenaged nephew to see Edge of Tomorrow, starring Tom Cruise. Hysterically entertaining. Appropriate for teens (scary monsters but no gore), and gripping for adults!

There was a 1982 movie called The Scarlet Pimpernel (from the 1905 novel by Baroness Emma Orczy) in which the dashing protagonist Percival Blakeney (played by Anthony Andrews in the film) goes around saying, “Sink me!” with a lilting accent. Great movie.

I thought of it when this week’s theme came to us through alert reader Emily Walt at Carbonite, who first gave us a salacious peek at a firm burning up the pink sheets:  CYNK Technology (OTCMKTS:CYNK).

Most of you may now know that CYNK rose from nothing to $6 billion between June 17 and July 10, a return of 20,000%. Last Friday the SEC abruptly halted trading, with market cap still at $4 billion.

The pink sheets or the grey market, or what used to be called the OTC market, should not be confused with “over the counter,” which often refers to shares on the Nasdaq or securities trading between brokers. This is the market where standards are loose and risk is high.

CYNK Technology is run by a guy in Belize. This one fellow is listed as CEO, President, CFO, Board Secretary and the only director. SEC documents suggest the company has no revenues and no real business plan and few if any assets.

But something got folks going and it seems the germinating seed was the suggestion that the company’s website offers introductions to celebrities for a fee.  It aims, we gather, to be the social networking site where common everyday dweebs and goofballs can meet Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie. (more…)

Tapering Tantrum

EDITORIAL NOTE: We’re right now plying the azure waters off Richard Branson’s Necker Island. The following edition of the Market Structure Map ran May 29, 2013, ahead of last year’s NIRI National Conference (if you’re heading to NIRI in Las Vegas this year, don’t miss my fireside chat about Flash Boys and Broken Markets with famed HFT expert and frequent CNBC guest Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading. More on that next week!). The Fed continues to be de facto captain of risk assets and the wind beneath their wings. It behooves us all in the IR profession to realize we’re in the process of undergoing separation anxiety. It just hasn’t manifested yet.

 

“If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.”

This witty dictum by Herb Stein, father of Ben Stein (yes, from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, The Wonder Years, Win Ben Stein’s Money and TV in general), is called Stein’s Law. It elucidates why stocks and dollars have had such a cantankerous relationship since 2008.

Last Wednesday, May 22, Ben Bernanke told Congress that the Federal Reserve might consider “tapering” its monetary intervention called quantitative easing (QE) “sometime in the next several meetings.” You’d think someone had yelled fire in a crowded theater. The Nikkei, Japan’s 225-component equity index, plunged 7%, equal to a similar drop for the Dow Jones Industrial Average at current levels. On US markets, stocks reversed large gains and swooned.

Why do stocks sometimes react violently to “monetary policy,” what the heck is “monetary policy,” and why should IROs care?

Let’s take them in reverse order. Investor-relations professionals today must care about monetary policy because it’s the single largest factor – greater than your financial results – determining the value of your shares.

By definition, “monetary policy” is the pursuit of broad economic objectives by regulating the supply of currency and its cost, and generally driven by national central banks like the Federal Reserve in the United States.

Stay with me here. We’ll get soon to why equities can throw tantrums. (more…)

Great Expectations

Happy New Year! Hope you spent the two-week break from these pages joyfully.

We’ve descended this week from the high Denver backbone of the continent to visit west in Santa Monica and sponsor NIRI’s Fundamentals of IR program. Following our New York trip before Christmas, we’ve marked the turn of the calendar by touching both coasts.

We’ll kick off the year with a story. I’ve just finished Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations on my Kindle. Yes, I realize it was first published in serial form in 1860 (the year the cattle ranch on which I grew up was homesteaded). I have a long reading list. It took me awhile to get around to it.

Lest I spoil excitement for the other three or four of you planning on it still, I’ll say simply that it’s a masterful narrative assemblage of plot points, the connections between which one would never fathom at the outset. Great storytelling never gets old.

The market is like that too. As you begin 2014 in the IR chair, remember that in a market dominated by algorithms – the principal purpose of which is to deceive – things are rarely as they seem.

Take trading from Dec 9-31, 2013. The US equity world it seemed was gathered in knots and pockets like people in an old west town where the gunslinger was expected anytime to ride through. Tones were hushed, gestures animated. A pregnant air of expectation hung like a storm.

Would the Fed finally taper? And if it did, what then?  (more…)

The Short Fed Story

Is the Federal Reserve fueling stock-market gains?

When St. Louis Fed president James Bullard addressed the Bowling Green, KY, Chamber of Commerce in February 2011, he pinpointed correlation between Ben Bernanke’s September 2010 Jackson Hole speech on “QE2,” the Fed’s second easy-money program, and the stock-market rebound that followed. Classical effects of monetary easing include rising equity prices, Mr. Bullard said.

The Fed wanted market appreciation because people feel better when the stuff they own seems more valuable. But I think we’re having the wrong debate. The question isn’t if Fed intervention increases stock prices, but this: Can prices set by middle men last?

Before actor Daniel Craig became the new James Bond he starred in a caper flick called Layer Cake that posited a rubric: The art of the deal is being a good middle man. The Fed is the ultimate global middle man. Since the dollar is the world’s reserve currency, the Fed as night manager of the cost and availability of dollars can affect everybody’s money. After all, save where barter still prevails, doing business involves money. Variability in its value is the fulcrum for the great planetary teeter-totter of commerce. The risk for the Fed is distorting global values with borrowing and intermediation.

In the stock market, we’re told it’s been a terrible year for “the shorts” – speculators who borrow shares and sell them on hopes of covering at a lower future price. The common measure is short interest, a twice-monthly metric denoting stocks borrowed, sold, and not yet covered. Historically, that’s about 5% of shares comprising the S&P 500. (more…)

The Flood

The word of the week was “flood.”

Here in Colorado, Denver had a coup d’état by weather patterns from Portland, Oregon for a week but our streets never ran in torrents. Where the Rocky Mountain watershed empties to the flood plain from the Mesozoic Era, occupied by present-day Boulder, Loveland and Greeley and small towns like Evans and Lyons hugging the banks of normally docile tributaries, the week past reshaped history and landscape. It will take months to recover.

In the markets too there was and remains a flood that surfaces with rising intensity from its subterranean aquifers to toss debris into market machinery. It’s the spreading vastness of complex market data.

SIDEBAR: If you’re in St. Louis Friday, join us at the NIRI luncheon Sept 20 for a rollicking session on the equity market – how it works and why it fails at times.

Data is the fuel powering market activity. Globally, trading in multiple asset classes turns on computerized models that depend on uninterrupted streams of reliable data. This gargantuan global data cross-pollination affects trading in your shares. After all, there are two million global indexes, as the WSJ’s Jason Zweig noted in a poignant view last weekend on modern equities. (more…)

Infinite Money Theorem

“What do you see out there?”

Out here in Crested Butte, CO, where the overnight temperature was 35 degrees, we see vast beauty, perhaps unparalleled on the planet.

As for the other “out there,” it’s the No. 1 question we’ve gotten the past two weeks, even with clients reporting financial results. They’re most concerned with the macro view: What do we think will happen to the stock market if and when the Fed stops buying government-backed securities?

Some observers predict doom. If the Fed quits printing money, the helium goes out of the balloon and down it comes. Others see the opposite. Just yesterday Jim Paulsen at Wells Capital said the Fed’s exit means markets can normalize, shifting from arbitraging data to investing in economic growth. He says stocks will rise.

It’s important to understand what the Federal Reserve is doing. The Fed isn’t printing money per se. It’s in effect engaging in a massive derivatives swap – trading one thing for another, neither of which is a hard asset. The Fed buys about $85 billion of Treasury securities and government-backed mortgage derivatives every month. Since these instruments are backed by US taxpayers and derive from either future tax receipts or underlying mortgages, both are derivatives. (more…)